The magnetic properties of photospheric magnetic bright points with high resolution spectropolarimetry

Keys, Peter H, Reid, Aaron, Mathioudakis, Mihalis, Shelyag, Sergiy, Henriques, Vasco MJ, Hewitt, Rebecca L, Del Moro, Dario, Jafarzadeh, Shahin, Jess, David B and Stangalini, Marco 2019, The magnetic properties of photospheric magnetic bright points with high resolution spectropolarimetry, Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: letters, vol. 488, no. 1, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1093/mnrasl/slz097.

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Title The magnetic properties of photospheric magnetic bright points with high resolution spectropolarimetry
Author(s) Keys, Peter H
Reid, Aaron
Mathioudakis, Mihalis
Shelyag, SergiyORCID iD for Shelyag, Sergiy orcid.org/0000-0002-6436-9347
Henriques, Vasco MJ
Hewitt, Rebecca L
Del Moro, Dario
Jafarzadeh, Shahin
Jess, David B
Stangalini, Marco
Journal name Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: letters
Volume number 488
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2019-09
ISSN 1745-3933
1745-3933
Keyword(s) Sun: activity
Sun: evolution
Sun: magnetic fields
Sun: photosphere
Summary Magnetic bright points are small-scale magnetic elements ubiquitous across the solar disk, with the prevailing theory suggesting that they form due to the process of convective collapse. Employing a unique full Stokes spectropolarimetric data set of a quiet Sun region close to disk centre obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope, we look at general trends in the properties of magnetic bright points. In total we track 300 MBPs in the data set and we employ NICOLE inversions to ascertain various parameters for the bright points such as line-of-sight magnetic field strength and line-of-sight velocity, for comparison. We observe a bimodal distribution in terms of maximum magnetic field strength in the bright points with peaks at ∼480 G and ∼1700 G, although we cannot attribute the kilogauss fields in this distribution solely to the process of convective collapse. Analysis of MURaM simulations does not return the same bimodal distribution. However, the simulations provide strong evidence that the emergence of new flux and diffusion of this new flux play a significant role in generating the weak bright point distribution seen in our observations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/mnrasl/slz097
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0201 Astronomical and Space Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Author(s)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30124269

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