Researchers' perspectives on scientific and ethical issues with transcranial direct current stimulation: an international survey

Riggall, Kate, Forlini, Cynthia, Carter, Adrian, Hall, Wayne, Weier, Megan, Partridge, Brad and Meinzer, Marcus 2015, Researchers' perspectives on scientific and ethical issues with transcranial direct current stimulation: an international survey, Scientific reports, vol. 5, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1038/srep10618.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Researchers' perspectives on scientific and ethical issues with transcranial direct current stimulation: an international survey
Author(s) Riggall, Kate
Forlini, CynthiaORCID iD for Forlini, Cynthia orcid.org/0000-0003-3809-8229
Carter, Adrian
Hall, Wayne
Weier, Megan
Partridge, Brad
Meinzer, Marcus
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 5
Article ID 10618
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Nature
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-06-12
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
Summary In the last decade, an increasing number of studies have suggested that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may enhance brain function in healthy individuals, and ameliorate cognitive and other symptoms in patients suffering from various medical conditions. This, along with its presumed safety, simplicity, and affordability, has generated great enthusiasm amongst researchers, clinicians, patient populations, and the public (including a growing "do-it-yourself" community). However, discussion about the effectiveness and ethics of tDCS thus far has been confined to small groups of tDCS researchers and bioethicists. We conducted an international online survey targeting the opinions of researchers using tDCS who were asked to rate the technique' s efficacy in different contexts. We also surveyed opinions about ethical concerns, self-enhancement and public availability. 265 complete responses were received and analyzed statistically and thematically. Our results emphasize the potential uses of tDCS in clinical and research contexts, but also highlight a number of emerging methodological and safety concerns, ethical challenges and the need for improved communication between researchers and bioethicists with regard to regulation of the device. Neither the media reputation of tDCS as a "miracle device" nor concerns expressed in recent neuroethical publications were entirely borne out in expert opinion.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/srep10618
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, The Author(s)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30125038

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Checking
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 17 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 19 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 29 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 09 Jul 2019, 14:29:30 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.