What clinical and laboratory parameters determine significant intra abdominal pathology for patients assessed in hospital with acute abdominal pain?

Abbas, Saleh M, Smithers, Troy and Truter, Etienne 2007, What clinical and laboratory parameters determine significant intra abdominal pathology for patients assessed in hospital with acute abdominal pain?, World journal of emergency surgery, vol. 2, pp. 1-4, doi: 10.1186/1749-7922-2-26.

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Title What clinical and laboratory parameters determine significant intra abdominal pathology for patients assessed in hospital with acute abdominal pain?
Author(s) Abbas, Saleh MORCID iD for Abbas, Saleh M orcid.org/0000-0002-9039-9603
Smithers, Troy
Truter, Etienne
Journal name World journal of emergency surgery
Volume number 2
Article ID 26
Start page 1
End page 4
Total pages 4
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2007
ISSN 1749-7922
Keyword(s) Abdominal Pain
Appendicitis
Acute Appendicitis
White Cell Count
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
Summary Background: Abdominal pain is a common cause for emergency admission. While some patients have serious abdominal pathology, a significant group of those patients have no specific cause for the pain. This study was conducted to identify those who have non-specific abdominal pain who can be either admitted short term for observation or reassured and discharged for outpatient management. Patients and methods: A prospective documentation of clinical and laboratory data was obtained on a consecutive cohort of 286 patients who were admitted to a surgical unit over a nine month period with symptoms of abdominal pain regarded severe enough for full assessment in the casualty department and admission to a surgical ward. The patients were followed until a definite diagnosis was made or the patient's condition and abdominal pain improved and the patient discharged. The hospital where the study took place is a small peripheral general hospital draining a population of 120,000 people in a rural area in New Zealand. Results: There were 286 admissions to the emergency department. Logistic regression multivariate statistical analysis showed that guarding raised white cells count, tachycardia and vomiting were the only variables associated with significant pathology. Conclusion: Patients with no vomiting, no guarding, who have normal pulse rates and normal white cell counts are unlikely to have significant pathology requiring further active intervention either medical or surgical.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1749-7922-2-26
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Abbas et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30126127

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
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