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Learning to expect: predicting sounds during movement is related to sensorimotor association during listening

Burgess, Jed D., Major, Brendan P., McNeel, Claire, Clark, Gillian, Lum, Jarrad and Enticott, Peter 2019, Learning to expect: predicting sounds during movement is related to sensorimotor association during listening, Frontiers in human neuroscience, vol. 13, doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2019.00215.

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Title Learning to expect: predicting sounds during movement is related to sensorimotor association during listening
Author(s) Burgess, Jed D.
Major, Brendan P.
McNeel, Claire
Clark, GillianORCID iD for Clark, Gillian orcid.org/0000-0002-6541-5130
Lum, JarradORCID iD for Lum, Jarrad orcid.org/0000-0003-2098-2403
Enticott, PeterORCID iD for Enticott, Peter orcid.org/0000-0002-6638-951X
Journal name Frontiers in human neuroscience
Volume number 13
Article ID 215
Total pages 14
Publisher Frontiers
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2019-07-03
ISSN 1662-5161
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Social Sciences
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Neurosciences
Psychology
Neurosciences & Neurology
sensory prediction
sensorimotor association
predictive comparison
TMS
EEG
MISMATCH NEGATIVITY
CORTICOSPINAL EXCITABILITY
SENSORY CONSEQUENCES
COROLLARY DISCHARGE
MOTOR REACTIVATION
BASIC RESEARCH
INVERSE MODEL
SUPPRESSION
PERCEPTION
ADAPTATION
Summary © 2019 Burgess, Major, McNeel, Clark, Lum and Enticott. Sensory experiences, such as sound, often result from our motor actions. Over time, repeated sound-producing performance can generate sensorimotor associations. However, it is not clear how sensory and motor information are associated. Here, we explore if sensory prediction is associated with the formation of sensorimotor associations during a learning task. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants produced index and little finger-swipes on a bespoke device, generating novel sounds. ERPs were also obtained as participants heard those sounds played back. Peak suppression was compared to assess sensory prediction. Additionally, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used during listening to generate finger-motor evoked potentials (MEPs). MEPs were recorded before and after training upon hearing these sounds, and then compared to reveal sensorimotor associations. Finally, we explored the relationship between these components. Results demonstrated that an increased positive-going peak (e.g., P2) and a suppressed negative-going peak (e.g., N2) were recorded during action, revealing some sensory prediction outcomes (P2: p = 0.050, (Formula presented.) = 0.208; N2: p = 0.001, (Formula presented.) = 0.474). Increased MEPs were also observed upon hearing congruent sounds compared with incongruent sounds (i.e., associated to a finger), demonstrating precise sensorimotor associations that were not present before learning (Index finger: p < 0.001, (Formula presented.) = 0.614; Little finger: p < 0.001, (Formula presented.) = 0.529). Consistent with our broad hypotheses, a negative association between the MEPs in one finger during listening and ERPs during performance of the other was observed (Index finger MEPs and Fz N1 action ERPs; r = −0.655, p = 0.003). Overall, data suggest that predictive mechanisms are associated with the fine-tuning of sensorimotor associations.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fnhum.2019.00215
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, Burgess, Major, McNeel, Clark, Lum and Enticott
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30127862

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.