mVps34 is activated by an acute bout of resistance exercise

MacKenzie, MG, Hamilton, David, Murray, JT and Baar, K 2007, mVps34 is activated by an acute bout of resistance exercise, Biochemical Society Transactions, vol. 35, no. 5, pp. 1314-1316, doi: 10.1042/BST0351314.


Title mVps34 is activated by an acute bout of resistance exercise
Author(s) MacKenzie, MG
Hamilton, DavidORCID iD for Hamilton, David orcid.org/0000-0002-5620-4788
Murray, JT
Baar, K
Journal name Biochemical Society Transactions
Volume number 35
Issue number 5
Start page 1314
End page 1316
Total pages 3
Publisher Portland Press
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2007-11-01
ISSN 0300-5127
1470-8752
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
hypertrophy
mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)
protein degradation
protein synthesis
resistance exercise
vacuolar protein sorting mutant 34 (Vp534)
SKELETAL-MUSCLE
PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL 3'-KINASES
MAMMALIAN TARGET
PROTEIN-KINASE
AMINO-ACIDS
3-KINASE
COMPLEX
VPS34
PHOSPHORYLATION
TRANSLATION
Summary Resistance-exercise training results in a progressive increase in muscle mass and force production. Following an acute bout of resistance exercise, the rate of protein synthesis increases proportionally with the increase in protein degradation, correlating at 3 h in the starved state. Amino acids taken immediately before or immediately after exercise increase the post-exercise rate of protein synthesis. Therefore a protein that controls protein degradation and amino acid-sensitivity would be a potential candidate for controlling the activation of protein synthesis following resistance exercise. One such candidate is the class III PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) Vps34 (vacuolar protein sorting mutant 34). Vps34 controls both autophagy and amino acid signalling to mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and its downstream target p70 S6K1 (S6 kinase 1). We have identified a significant increase in mVps34 (mammalian Vps34) activity 3 h after resistance exercise, continuing for at least 6 h, and propose a mechanism whereby mVps34 could act as an internal amino acid sensor to mTOR after resistance exercise.
Language eng
DOI 10.1042/BST0351314
Field of Research 0601 Biochemistry and Cell Biology
1101 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolomics
HERDC Research category CN.1 Other journal article
Copyright notice ©2007, Biochemical Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30128096

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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