Anaemia and its relation to demographic, socio-economic and anthropometric factors in rural primary school children in Hai Phong City, Vietnam

Hoang, Ngan T.D., Orellana, Liliana, Le, Tuyen D., Gibson, Rosalind S., Worsley, Tony, Sinclair, Andrew J., Hoang, Nghien T.T. and Szymlek-Gay, Ewa 2019, Anaemia and its relation to demographic, socio-economic and anthropometric factors in rural primary school children in Hai Phong City, Vietnam, Nutrients, vol. 11, no. 7, doi: 10.3390/nu11071478.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Anaemia and its relation to demographic, socio-economic and anthropometric factors in rural primary school children in Hai Phong City, Vietnam
Author(s) Hoang, Ngan T.D.
Orellana, LilianaORCID iD for Orellana, Liliana orcid.org/0000-0003-3736-4337
Le, Tuyen D.
Gibson, Rosalind S.
Worsley, TonyORCID iD for Worsley, Tony orcid.org/0000-0002-4635-6059
Sinclair, Andrew J.
Hoang, Nghien T.T.
Szymlek-Gay, EwaORCID iD for Szymlek-Gay, Ewa orcid.org/0000-0002-6533-7945
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 11
Issue number 7
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2019-06-28
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) Vietnam
anaemia
childhood overweight/obesity
double burden of diseases
malnutrition
school children
Summary © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Little is known about the prevalence of anaemia and associated factors in school children in Vietnam. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of anaemia and its subtypes, and the associations of types of anaemia with demographic, socio-economic and anthropometric factors among 6–9-year-old primary school children in rural areas of Hai Phong City, Vietnam. Haemoglobin (Hb) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were measured, and demographic, socio-economic and anthropometric data were collected in 893 children from eight primary schools. The prevalence of anaemia (Hb < 115 g/L) was 12.9% (95% CI: 8.1%, 19.9%), microcytic anaemia (Hb < 115 g/L and MCV < 80 fL) was 7.9% (95% CI: 5.3%, 11.6%) and normocytic anaemia (Hb < 115 g/L and MCV 80–90 fL) was 5.3% (95% CI: 2.9%, 9.5%). No child presented with macrocytic anaemia (Hb < 115 g/L and MCV > 90 fL). Children who were underweight, wasted, or in anthropometric failure (either underweight, stunted or wasted) were more likely to be anaemic (all p ≤ 0.004), and specifically, to have normocytic anaemia (all p ≤ 0.006), than those who were not underweight, wasted or in anthropometric failure. Stunted children were more likely to be anaemic (p = 0.018) than those who were not stunted. Overweight/obese children were less likely to be anaemic (p = 0.026) or have normocytic anaemia (p = 0.038) compared with children who were not overweight/obese. No anthropometric status indicator was associated with the risk of microcytic anaemia. No demographic or socio-economic factor was associated with any type of anaemia. Anaemia remains a public health issue in rural areas in Hai Phong City, Vietnam, and future approaches for its prevention and control should target undernourished primary school children.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu11071478
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30128216

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 38 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 25 Jul 2019, 08:54:59 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.