Joint physical-activity/screen-time trajectories during early childhood: socio-demographic predictors and consequences on health-related quality-of-life and socio-emotional outcomes

Del Pozo-Cruz, Borja, Perales, Francisco, Parker, Phil, Lonsdale, Chris, Noetel, Michael, Hesketh, Kylie D. and Sanders, Taren 2019, Joint physical-activity/screen-time trajectories during early childhood: socio-demographic predictors and consequences on health-related quality-of-life and socio-emotional outcomes, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 16, no. 1, doi: 10.1186/s12966-019-0816-3.

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Title Joint physical-activity/screen-time trajectories during early childhood: socio-demographic predictors and consequences on health-related quality-of-life and socio-emotional outcomes
Author(s) Del Pozo-Cruz, Borja
Perales, Francisco
Parker, Phil
Lonsdale, Chris
Noetel, Michael
Hesketh, Kylie D.ORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie D. orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Sanders, Taren
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 16
Issue number 1
Article ID 55
Total pages 13
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2019-07-08
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
Time use
Trajectory analysis
Physical activity
Screen time
Child development
Health
24-HOUR MOVEMENT GUIDELINES
SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR
CHILDREN
ASSOCIATIONS
INDICATORS
TODDLERS
YOUTH
DETERMINANTS
ADULTHOOD
Summary © 2019 The Author(s). Background: Understanding the early roots of physical activity and sedentary behaviors is critical to developing intervention programs that promote healthy lifestyle habits in infants and children. There is, however, no evidence on how these behaviors cluster and develop together during early childhood. The aim of this study was to identify single and joint longitudinal trajectories in physical activity and screen time amongst children aged 0 to 9 years, their social-demographic predictors and their prospective health-related quality-of-life and socio-emotional outcomes. Methods: Three waves of data from The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, a national study tracking two cohorts every 2 years (B-cohort, 0-5 years, n = 4,164; K-cohort, 4-9 years, n = 3,974) were analysed. Growth mixture modelling was applied to longitudinal time-use diary data to identify joint trajectories in children's physical activity and screen time over Waves 1-3. Key socio-demographic variables measured at Wave 1 were used to predict membership in different trajectories. The prospective consequences (at Wave 3) of time-use trajectories on health-related quality-of-life and socio-emotional outcomes were assessed. Results: Three physical-activity/screen-time trajectories were identified for both cohorts: Cluster-A - children who maintained low levels of physical activity and screen time (50% of the sample), Cluster-B - children who progressively increased physical activity and maintained low screen-time levels (25%), and Cluster-C - children who maintained low physical-activity levels and increased screen time (25%). Children in Cluster-B experienced the best health-related quality-of-life and socio-emotional outcomes, while those in Cluster-C experienced the worst. Children who were female, Indigenous, from non-English-speaking backgrounds, not living with two biological parents, in more affluent households and neighbourhoods, without siblings and with parents with poor mental health were at greater risk of falling into Cluster-A or Cluster-C. Conclusion: Our findings identified which children are most at-risk of falling into time-use trajectories that lead to poor health-related quality-of-life and socio-emotional outcomes later in life, increasing our ability to monitor, detect and prevent these suboptimal behaviours prior to their onset.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-019-0816-3
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
13 Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID ARC FT130100637
Copyright notice ©2019, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30128450

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