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Kaempferol: a key emphasis to its anticancer potential

Imran, Muhammad, Salehi, Bahare, Sharifi-Rad, Javad, Gondal, Tanweer Aslam, Saeed, Farhan, Imran, Ali, Shahbaz, Muhammad, Fokou, Patrick Valere Tsouh, Arshad, Muhammad Umair, Khan, Haroon, Guerreiro, Susana G, Martins, Natalia and Estevinho, Leticia M 2019, Kaempferol: a key emphasis to its anticancer potential, Molecules, vol. 24, no. 12, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.3390/molecules24122277.

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Title Kaempferol: a key emphasis to its anticancer potential
Author(s) Imran, Muhammad
Salehi, Bahare
Sharifi-Rad, Javad
Gondal, Tanweer Aslam
Saeed, Farhan
Imran, Ali
Shahbaz, Muhammad
Fokou, Patrick Valere Tsouh
Arshad, Muhammad Umair
Khan, Haroon
Guerreiro, Susana G
Martins, Natalia
Estevinho, Leticia M
Journal name Molecules
Volume number 24
Issue number 12
Article ID 2277
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2019-06
ISSN 1420-3049
Keyword(s) kaempferol
pharmacokinetics
pharmacodynamics
antioxidant
anticancer
chemoprevention
apoptosis
cell cycle arrest
metastasis
reactive oxygen species
Summary A marked decrease in human cancers, including breast cancer, bone cancer, and cervical cancer, has been linked to the consumption of vegetable and fruit, and the corresponding chemoprotective effect has been associated with the presence of several active molecules, such as kaempferol. Kaempferol is a major flavonoid aglycone found in many natural products, such as beans, bee pollen, broccoli, cabbage, capers, cauliflower, chia seeds, chives, cumin, moringa leaves, endive, fennel, and garlic. Kaempferol displays several pharmacological properties, among them antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antitumor, cardioprotective, neuroprotective, and antidiabetic activities, and is being applied in cancer chemotherapy. Specifically, kaempferol-rich food has been linked to a decrease in the risk of developing some types of cancers, including skin, liver, and colon. The mechanisms of action include apoptosis, cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, downregulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related markers, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B signaling pathways. In this sense, this article reviews data from experimental studies that investigated the links between kaempferol and kaempferol-rich food intake and cancer prevention. Even though growing evidence supports the use of kaempferol for cancer prevention, further preclinical and clinical investigations using kaempferol or kaempferol-rich foods are of pivotal importance before any public health recommendation or formulation using kaempferol.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/molecules24122277
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0305 Organic Chemistry
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30128820

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.