The potential of a narrative and creative arts approach to enhance transition outcomes for Indigenous Australians following traumatic brain injury

Bohanna, India, Fitts, Michelle, Bird, Katrina, Fleming, Jennifer, Gilroy, John, Clough, Alan, Esterman, Adrian, Maruff, Paul and Potter, Martin 2019, The potential of a narrative and creative arts approach to enhance transition outcomes for Indigenous Australians following traumatic brain injury, Brain impairment, vol. 20, no. 2, Special Issue, pp. 160-170, doi: 10.1017/BrImp.2019.25.

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Title The potential of a narrative and creative arts approach to enhance transition outcomes for Indigenous Australians following traumatic brain injury
Author(s) Bohanna, India
Fitts, Michelle
Bird, Katrina
Fleming, Jennifer
Gilroy, John
Clough, Alan
Esterman, Adrian
Maruff, Paul
Potter, MartinORCID iD for Potter, Martin orcid.org/0000-0002-1681-6341
Journal name Brain impairment
Volume number 20
Issue number 2
Season Special Issue
Start page 160
End page 170
Total pages 11
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2019-09
ISSN 1443-9646
1839-5252
Keyword(s) Traumatic brain injury
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health
narrative
rehabilitation
cultural safety
Summary Background: Increasingly, narrative and creative arts approaches are being used to enhance recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Narrative and arts-based approaches congruent with Indigenous storytelling may therefore provide benefit during the transition from hospital to home for some Indigenous TBI patients. This qualitative study explored the use and impact of this approach as part of a larger, longitudinal study of TBI transition with Indigenous Australians.Method: A combined narrative and arts-based approach was used with one Indigenous Australian artist to describe his transition experiences following TBI. Together with the researchers and filmmaking team, the artist was involved in aspects of the process. The artist contributed two paintings, detailing the story of his life and TBI. Based on the artworks, a film was co-created. Following the viewing of the film, impacts of the narrative and arts-based process were examined through semi-structured interviews with the artist, a service provider and a family member. Multiple sources of data were used in the final thematic analysis including transcripts of the interviews and filming, paintings (including storylines) and researcher notes.Results: Positive impacts from the process for the artist included positive challenge; healing and identity; understanding TBI and raising awareness.Discussion: This approach may enable the individual to take ownership over their transition story and to make sense of their life following TBI at a critical point in their recovery. A combined narrative and arts-based approach has potential as a culturally responsive rehabilitation tool for use with Indigenous Australians during the transition period following TBI.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/BrImp.2019.25
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
190204 Film and Television
170110 Psychological Methodology, Design and Analysis
11 Medical and Health Sciences
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920303 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health - Health System Performance (incl. Effectiveness of Interventions)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, Australasian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30128972

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