A philosophical and historical analysis of “Generation Identity”: fascism, online media, and the European New Right

Richards, Imogen 2019, A philosophical and historical analysis of “Generation Identity”: fascism, online media, and the European New Right, Terrorism and political violence, pp. 1-29.

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Title A philosophical and historical analysis of “Generation Identity”: fascism, online media, and the European New Right
Author(s) Richards, ImogenORCID iD for Richards, Imogen orcid.org/0000-0001-6317-5631
Journal name Terrorism and political violence
Start page 1
End page 29
Total pages 29
Publisher Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2019-09-10
ISSN 0954-6553
Keyword(s) Generation Identity
fascism
European New Right
activism
social media
Summary This article analyzes ideological and organizational characteristics of the pan-European youth movement, “Generation Identity” (GI), through a philosophical and historical lens. With a synoptic perspective on existing and original research, it outlines an analysis of key GI literature as well as its ideological influences, activist behavior, and media strategies. This research reveals that, like other 20th and 21st century examples of neo-fascism, the movement is syncretic and attempts to legitimize its political aims through reference to historical quasi- and proto-fascist cases, in combination with popular left and right-wing political ideals. A reflection on GI’s activist behavior, on the other hand, demonstrates that the movement is relatively unique in the field of current far-right politics; particularly in the extent to which it draws practical inspiration from the tactics and propagandizing strategies of contemporary left-wing movements. GI’s online presence, including its leaders’ promotion of gamification, also illustrates its distinctive appeal to young, relatively affluent, countercultural and digitally-literate populations. Finally, while in many respects GI is characteristic of the “European New Right” (ENR), the analysis finds that its spokespersons’ various promotion of capitalism and commodification, including through their advocacy of international trade and sale of merchandise, diverges from the anti-capitalist philosophizing of contemporary ENR thinkers.
Language eng
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1602 Criminology
1606 Political Science
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30129374

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Humanities and Social Sciences
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