Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease

Hanson, Linda L Magnusson, Rod, Naja Hulvej, Vahtera, Jussi, Peristera, Paraskevi, Pentti, Jaana, Rugulies, Reiner, Madsen, Ida Elisabeth Huitfeldt, LaMontagne, Anthony D, Milner, Allison, Lange, Theis, Suominen, Sakari, Stenholm, Sari, Xu, Tianwei, Kivimäki, Mika and Westerlund, Hugo 2019, Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease, Occupational and environmental medicine, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1136/oemed-2018-105595.

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Title Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease
Author(s) Hanson, Linda L Magnusson
Rod, Naja Hulvej
Vahtera, Jussi
Peristera, Paraskevi
Pentti, Jaana
Rugulies, Reiner
Madsen, Ida Elisabeth Huitfeldt
LaMontagne, Anthony DORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Milner, AllisonORCID iD for Milner, Allison orcid.org/0000-0003-4657-0503
Lange, Theis
Suominen, Sakari
Stenholm, Sari
Xu, Tianwei
Kivimäki, Mika
Westerlund, Hugo
Journal name Occupational and environmental medicine
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BMJ
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2019
ISSN 1351-0711
1470-7926
Keyword(s) cardiovascular
diabetes mellitus
mental health
meta-analysis
stress
Summary Objectives: Several recent large-scale studies have indicated a prospective association between job strain and coronary heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Job strain is also associated with poorer mental health, a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease. This study investigates the prospective relationships between change in job strain, poor mental health and cardiometabolic disease, and whether poor mental health is a potential mediator of the relationship between job strain and cardiometabolic disease. Methods: We used data from five cohort studies from Australia, Finland, Sweden and UK, including 47 757 men and women. Data on job strain across two measurements 1-5 years apart (time 1 (T1)-time 2 (T2)) were used to define increase or decrease in job strain. Poor mental health (symptoms in the top 25% of the distribution of the scales) at T2 was considered a potential mediator in relation to incident cardiometabolic disease, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes, following T2 for a mean of 5-18 years. Results: An increase in job strain was associated with poor mental health (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.76), and a decrease in job strain was associated with lower risk in women (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.60-0.84). However, no clear association was observed between poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.23), nor between increase (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.90-1.14) and decrease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.22) in job strain and cardiometabolic disease. Conclusions: The results did not support that change in job strain is a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease and yielded no support for poor mental health as a mediator.
Notes Online First Article
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/oemed-2018-105595
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1599 Other Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Author(s)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30129739

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