Openly accessible

Longitudinal white matter development in children is associated with puberty, attentional difficulties, and mental health

Genc, Sila, Malpas, Charles B., Gulenc, Alisha, Sciberras, Emma, Efron, Daryl, Silk, Timothy J. and Seal, Marc L. 2019, Longitudinal white matter development in children is associated with puberty, attentional difficulties, and mental health, bioRxiv, pp. 1-25, doi: 10.1101/607671.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Longitudinal white matter development in children is associated with puberty, attentional difficulties, and mental health
Author(s) Genc, Sila
Malpas, Charles B.
Gulenc, Alisha
Sciberras, EmmaORCID iD for Sciberras, Emma orcid.org/0000-0003-2812-303X
Efron, Daryl
Silk, Timothy J.ORCID iD for Silk, Timothy J. orcid.org/0000-0002-7290-512X
Seal, Marc L.
Journal name bioRxiv
Start page 1
End page 25
Total pages 25
Publisher Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Place of publication Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.
Publication date 2019-04-19
Keyword(s) White matter
Longitudinal
Fixel-based analysis
Puberty
Attention
Internalising
Summary Purpose: The pubertal period involves dynamic white matter development. This period also corresponds with rapid gains in higher cognitive functions including attention, as well as increased risk of developing mental health difficulties. We performed a longitudinal investigation of the relationship between white matter fibre properties and pubertal stage, attentional difficulties, and internalising problems Methods: This study reports on a community-based sample of children aged 9-13 years (n=130, 47 female). Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data were acquired on a 3.0T Siemens Tim Trio (b=2800 s/mm2, 60 directions) at two time-points approximately 16 months apart: time-point 1 (age: M = 10.4, SD = .44 years old), time-point 2 (age: M = 11.7, SD = .51 years old). We leverage the fixel-based analysis (FBA) framework, to derive measures of: fibre density (FD), fibre cross-section (FC), and fibre density and cross-section (FDC), in 17 manually delineated white matter tracts. We apply a longitudinal mixed-effects modelling analysis: to understand how specific fibre properties vary with age, sex, and pubertal stage; and as a function of the development of internalising behaviours and attentional difficulties. Results: We observed significant increases in FD, FC, and FDC across a large number of white matter pathways, with protracted development of frontal pathways such as the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) and uncinate fasciculus (UF). We observed a linear relationship between FBA metrics and pubertal stage, in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). Increases in FD were associated with greater attentional dysfunction, particularly in older males. Lastly, we found evidence for an association between lower FD and greater internalising problems in the right UF, a region known to be implicated in psychiatric disorders. Discussion: These longitudinal results shed light on regional fibre developmental profiles in early puberty. The development of fibre density and morphology across ages 9-13 years involved the expansion of key white matter tracts, excluding regions known to have protracted development over adolescence. The associations between mental health and attentional problems with fibre density in the UF suggests that this region may be sensitive to adopting a different neurodevelopmental course in the presence of such symptoms. Overall, our findings highlight the interrelated nature of fibre development with puberty, mental health problems, and attentional difficulties.
Language eng
DOI 10.1101/607671
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 170299 Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30129825

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 15 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 16 Sep 2019, 13:49:08 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.