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Male partner attendance at antenatal care and adherence to antenatal care guidelines: secondary analysis of 2011 Ethiopian demographic and health survey data

Forbes, Faye, Wynter, Karen, Wade, Catherine, Zeleke, Berihun M. and Fisher, Jane 2018, Male partner attendance at antenatal care and adherence to antenatal care guidelines: secondary analysis of 2011 Ethiopian demographic and health survey data, BMC pregnancy and childbirth, vol. 18, no. 1, doi: 10.1186/s12884-018-1775-4.

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Title Male partner attendance at antenatal care and adherence to antenatal care guidelines: secondary analysis of 2011 Ethiopian demographic and health survey data
Author(s) Forbes, Faye
Wynter, KarenORCID iD for Wynter, Karen orcid.org/0000-0003-4620-7691
Wade, Catherine
Zeleke, Berihun M.
Fisher, Jane
Journal name BMC pregnancy and childbirth
Volume number 18
Issue number 1
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-05-09
ISSN 1471-2393
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Male involvement
Male attendance
Fathers
Ethiopia
Focused antenatal care
Demographic and health survey
DEVELOPING-COUNTRIES
SERVICE UTILIZATION
EDUCATION SERVICES
IMPACT
HUSBANDS
DISTRICT
Summary © 2018 The Author(s). Background: Complications during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period present a significant and complex public health problem in low income countries such as Ethiopia. One strategy endorsed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) to improve maternal and child health outcomes is to encourage male partner involvement in pregnancy care. This research aimed to explore the relationships between 1) male attendance at antenatal care and 2) socio-economic and women's empowerment factors and adherence to focused antenatal care guidelines among women receiving care in Ethiopia. Methods: Secondary analysis of 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data. A sub-sample of couples with a child aged 0-2years old, for whom women attended at least one antenatal care (ANC) appointment was selected. Predictor variables on socio-economic position, demographic and women's empowerment factors, and male attendance at antenatal care were identified. Six outcome variables were constructed to indicate whether or not women: commenced ANC in the first trimester, attended at least four ANC appointments, received a urine test, received a blood test, were counselled on potential complications during pregnancy and met these focused antenatal care guidelines. Binary logistic regression was performed to estimate the relationship between the predictor and outcome variables. Results: After controlling for other factors, women whose partners attended ANC were significantly more likely to receive urine and blood tests and be counselled about pregnancy complications compared to women who attended alone. Male attendance was not associated with women commencing care in the first trimester or attending at least four appointments. Although more women whose male partners had attended appointments received all recommended components of ANC than those who attended alone, this association was not significant. Conclusions: The results revealed some benefits and did not detect harms from including male partners in focused antenatal care. Including men may require changes to maternal healthcare systems and training of healthcare workers, to adopt 'father inclusive' practices. Given the limited research in this area, large population studies including the DHS routinely carried out in Ethiopia could enhance knowledge by including more detailed indicators of male involvement in pregnancy, maternal and child healthcare and early child development.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12884-018-1775-4
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1110 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30129861

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.