A low-fat diet up-regulates expression of fatty acid taste receptor gene FFAR4 in fungiform papillae in humans: a co-twin randomised controlled trial

Costanzo, Andrew, Liu, Dongli, Nowson, Caryl, Duesing, Konsta, Archer, Nicholas, Bowe, Steven and Keast, Russell 2019, A low-fat diet up-regulates expression of fatty acid taste receptor gene FFAR4 in fungiform papillae in humans: a co-twin randomised controlled trial, British journal of nutrition, vol. 122, no. 11, pp. 1212-1220, doi: 10.1017/S0007114519002368.

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Title A low-fat diet up-regulates expression of fatty acid taste receptor gene FFAR4 in fungiform papillae in humans: a co-twin randomised controlled trial
Formatted title A low-fat diet up-regulates expression of fatty acid taste receptor gene FFAR4 in fungiform papillae in humans: a co-twin randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Costanzo, Andrew
Liu, Dongli
Nowson, CarylORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Duesing, Konsta
Archer, Nicholas
Bowe, StevenORCID iD for Bowe, Steven orcid.org/0000-0003-3813-842X
Keast, RussellORCID iD for Keast, Russell orcid.org/0000-0003-2147-7687
Journal name British journal of nutrition
Volume number 122
Issue number 11
Start page 1212
End page 1220
Total pages 9
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2019-12
ISSN 0007-1145
1475-2662
Keyword(s) FFAR4
GPR120
RCT
fat intake
fatty acid taste
Summary Fatty acid taste (FAT) perception is involved in the regulation of dietary fat intake, where impaired FAT is associated with increased fatty food intake. There are a number of FAT receptors identified on human taste cells that are potentially responsible for FAT perception. Manipulating dietary fat intake, and in turn FAT perception, would elucidate which receptors are associated with long-term regulation of FAT perception. This study aimed to assess associations between diet-mediated changes to FAT receptors and FAT perception in humans. A co-twin randomized controlled trial was conducted, where each matching twin within a pair were randomly allocated to either an 8-week low-fat (LF; <20% energy fat) or high-fat (HF; >35% energy fat) diet. At baseline and week 8, fungiform papillae were biopsied in the fasted state and FAT receptor gene expressions (CD36, FFAR2, FFAR4, GPR84 and KNCA2) were measured using RT-PCR; and fatty acid taste threshold (FATT) was assessed using 3-alternate forced choice methodology. Linear mixed models were fitted, adjusting for correlation between co-twins. Intakes were compliant with the study design, with the LF and HF groups consuming 14.8% and 39.9% energy from fat, respectively. Expression of FFAR4 increased by 38% in the LF group (P=0.023; time-diet interaction P=0.063). ΔFFAR4 (Δ, week 8 - baseline) was associated with Δfat intake (g) (β=-159.4; P<0.001) and ΔFATT (β=-8.8; P=0.016). In summary, FFAR4 is involved in long-term diet-mediated changes to FAT perception. Manipulating dietary fat intake, and therefore FFAR4 expression, might aid in reducing taste-mediated passive overconsumption of fatty foods.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0007114519002368
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0702 Animal Production
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
0908 Food Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30130012

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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