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Implication of viral infections for greenhouse gas dynamics in freshwater wetlands: challenges and perspectives

Bonetti, Giuditta, Trevathan-Tackett, Stacey, Carnell, Paul and Macreadie, Peter 2019, Implication of viral infections for greenhouse gas dynamics in freshwater wetlands: challenges and perspectives, Frontiers in microbiology, vol. 10, doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2019.01962.

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Title Implication of viral infections for greenhouse gas dynamics in freshwater wetlands: challenges and perspectives
Author(s) Bonetti, Giuditta
Trevathan-Tackett, StaceyORCID iD for Trevathan-Tackett, Stacey orcid.org/0000-0002-4977-0757
Carnell, PaulORCID iD for Carnell, Paul orcid.org/0000-0001-6747-1366
Macreadie, PeterORCID iD for Macreadie, Peter orcid.org/0000-0001-7362-0882
Journal name Frontiers in microbiology
Volume number 10
Article ID 1962
Total pages 11
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2019-08
ISSN 1664-302X
Summary © 2019 Bonetti, Trevathan-Tackett, Carnell and Macreadie. Viruses are non-living, acellular entities, and the most abundant biological agents on earth. They are widely acknowledged as having the capacity to influence global biogeochemical cycles by infecting the bacterial and archaeal populations that regulate carbon and nutrient turnover. Evidence suggests that the majority of viruses in wetlands are bacteriophages, but despite their importance, studies on how viruses control the prokaryotic community and the concomitant impacts on ecosystem function (such as carbon cycling and greenhouse gas flux) in wetlands are rare. Here we investigate virus-prokaryote interactions in freshwater wetland ecosystems in the context of their potential influence on biogeochemical cycling. Specifically, we (1) synthesize existing literature to establish current understanding of virus-prokaryote interactions, focusing on the implications for wetland greenhouse gas dynamics and (2) identify future research priorities. Viral dynamics in freshwater wetlands have received much less attention compared to those in marine ecosystems. However, based on our literature review, within the last 10 years, viral ecology studies on freshwater wetlands have increased twofold. Despite this increase in literature, the potential implication of viral infections on greenhouse gas emission dynamics is still a knowledge gap. We hypothesize that the rate of greenhouse gas emissions and the pool of sequestered carbon could be strongly linked to the type and rate of viral infection. Viral replication mechanism choice will consequently influence the microbial efficiency of organic matter assimilation and thus the ultimate fate of carbon as a greenhouse gas or stored in soils.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fmicb.2019.01962
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2019, Bonetti, Trevathan-Tackett, Carnell and Macreadie.
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30130097

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.