Are children with higher self-reported wellbeing and perceived motor competence more physically active? A longitudinal study

Visser, Ebonee L., Mazzoli, Emiliano, Hinkley, Trina, Lander, Natalie J., Utesch, Till and Barnett, Lisa M. 2020, Are children with higher self-reported wellbeing and perceived motor competence more physically active? A longitudinal study, Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 270-275, doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.09.005.

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Title Are children with higher self-reported wellbeing and perceived motor competence more physically active? A longitudinal study
Author(s) Visser, Ebonee L.
Mazzoli, EmilianoORCID iD for Mazzoli, Emiliano orcid.org/0000-0002-9207-4167
Hinkley, TrinaORCID iD for Hinkley, Trina orcid.org/0000-0003-2742-8579
Lander, Natalie J.
Utesch, Till
Barnett, Lisa M.ORCID iD for Barnett, Lisa M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9731-625X
Journal name Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Volume number 23
Issue number 3
Start page 270
End page 275
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2020-03
ISSN 1440-2440
1878-1861
Keyword(s) Child
Motor skills
Psychosocial wellbeing
Perceptions
Physical activity
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Sport Sciences
SKILL COMPETENCE
YOUNG CHILDRENS
HEALTH
ASSOCIATIONS
KINDL
LIFE
Summary © 2019 Objectives: Self-perceptions such as perceived motor competence and psychosocial wellbeing have been identified as important to children's physical activity. The study's purpose was to explore whether perceived motor competence and psychosocial wellbeing were determinants of physical activity, one year after a baseline assessment. Design: Longitudinal study. Methods: A total of 134 children (65.7% boys, 34.3% girls) aged 6–7 years at baseline (2016), and 7–8 years at follow-up (2017) were included in this study. Pearson's correlations assessed associations at baseline and follow-up between moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) (accelerometers) and (i) total perceived motor competence and subdomains (the pictorial scale of Perceived Movement Skill Competence) and (ii) psychosocial wellbeing and sub-domains — KidKINDL KINDer Lebensqualitätsfragebogen: Children Quality of Life Questionnaire (KINDLR). Variables identified as significant in Pearson's correlations were included in mixed model analyses, adjusting for accelerometer wear time, sex and age. Results: Baseline perceived object control skills was associated with MVPA at follow-up (r = 0.38, p < 0.001), but perceived locomotor skills were not. Self-esteem was the only subdomain of psychosocial wellbeing that demonstrated significant association with MVPA at baseline (r = 0.21, p < 0.05). Perceived object control (B = 1.36, p = 0.019, 95% CI [0.23, 2.50]) and self-esteem (B = 0.32, p = 0.001, 95% CI [0.13, 0.50]) positively predicted MVPA; albeit with small effects. Conclusions: Focusing on improving children's perceived object control and self-reported self-esteem may contribute to children's physical activity participation.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.09.005
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30130195

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
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