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Muscular adaptations to whole body blood flow restriction training and detraining

Brandner, Christopher R., Clarkson, Matthew, Kidgell, Dawson J. and Warmington, Stuart 2019, Muscular adaptations to whole body blood flow restriction training and detraining, Frontiers in physiology, vol. 10, doi: 10.3389/fphys.2019.01099.

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Title Muscular adaptations to whole body blood flow restriction training and detraining
Author(s) Brandner, Christopher R.
Clarkson, MatthewORCID iD for Clarkson, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-0447-9269
Kidgell, Dawson J.
Warmington, StuartORCID iD for Warmington, Stuart orcid.org/0000-0002-2414-7539
Journal name Frontiers in physiology
Volume number 10
Article ID 1099
Total pages 12
Publisher Frontiers
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2019-09-10
ISSN 1664-042X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physiology
strength training
hypertrophy
vascular occlusion
rehabilitation
BFR
resistance exercise
MUSCLE STRENGTH
INTENSITY
LOAD
SIZE
MASS
Summary © Copyright © 2019 Brandner, Clarkson, Kidgell and Warmington. Resistance training with blood flow restriction is typically performed during single exercises for the lower- or upper-body, which may not replicate real world programming. The present study examined the change in muscle strength and mass in a young healthy population during an 8-week whole body resistance training program, as well as monitoring these adaptations following a 4-week detraining period. Thirty-nine participants (27 males, 12 females) were allocated into four groups: blood flow restriction training (BFR-T); moderate-heavy load training (HL-T), light-load training (LL-T) or a non-exercise control (CON). Testing measurements were taken at Baseline, during mid-point of training (week 4), end of training (week 8) and following four weeks of detraining (week 12) and included anthropometrics, body composition, muscle thickness (MTH) at seven sites, and maximal dynamic strength (1RM) for six resistance exercises. Whole body resistance training with BFR significantly improved lower- and upper-body strength (overall; 11% increase in total tonnage), however, this was similar to LL-T (12%), but both groups were lower in comparison with HL-T (21%) and all groups greater than CON. Some markers of body composition (e.g., lean mass) and MTH significantly increased over the course of the 8-week training period, but these were similar across all groups. Following detraining, whole body strength remained significantly elevated for both BFR-T (6%) and HL-T (14%), but only the HL-T group remained higher than all other groups. Overall, whole body resistance training with blood flow restriction was shown to be an effective training mode to increase muscular strength and mass. However, traditional moderate-heavy load resistance training resulted in greater adaptations in muscle strength and mass as well as higher levels of strength maintenance following detraining.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2019.01099
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, Brandner, Clarkson, Kidgell and Warmington
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30130257

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.