Openly accessible

Silk physico-chemical variability and mechanical robustness facilitates intercontinental invasibility of a spider

Viera, Carmen, Garcia, Luis F., Lacava, Mariángeles, Fang, Jian, Wang, Xungai, Kasumovic, Michael M. and Blamires, Sean J. 2019, Silk physico-chemical variability and mechanical robustness facilitates intercontinental invasibility of a spider, Scientific reports, vol. 9, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-49463-9.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Silk physico-chemical variability and mechanical robustness facilitates intercontinental invasibility of a spider
Author(s) Viera, Carmen
Garcia, Luis F.
Lacava, Mariángeles
Fang, JianORCID iD for Fang, Jian orcid.org/0000-0003-2981-9733
Wang, XungaiORCID iD for Wang, Xungai orcid.org/0000-0002-3549-6769
Kasumovic, Michael M.
Blamires, Sean J.
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 9
Article ID 13273
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2019-09
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
LONGINQUA L. KOCH
1867 ARANEAE DESIDAE
CONSEQUENCES
PLASTICITY
STRATEGIES
INVASIONS
HABITATS
RECORDS
Summary There are substantive problems associated with invasive species, including threats to endemic organisms and biodiversity. Understanding the mechanisms driving invasions is thus critical. Variable extended phenotypes may enable animals to invade into novel environments. We explored here the proposition that silk variability is a facilitator of invasive success for the highly invasive Australian house spider, Badumna longinqua. We compared the physico-chemical and mechanical properties and underlying gene expressions of its major ampullate (MA) silk between a native Sydney population and an invasive counterpart from Montevideo, Uruguay. We found that while differential gene expressions might explain the differences in silk amino acid compositions and protein nanostructures, we did not find any significant differences in silk mechanical properties across the populations. Our results accordingly suggest that B. longinqua's silk remains functionally robust despite underlying physico-chemical and genetic variability as the spider expands its range across continents. They also imply that a combination of silk physico-chemical plasticity combined with mechanical robustness might contribute more broadly to spider invasibilities.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-019-49463-9
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID Uruguay National Grants System (ANII) (1-109498) (M.L.)
National System of Investigators (SNI-ANII)
Centro Universitario Regional del Este (CURE) (L.G.F.)
Australian Research Council (DE140101281)
Hermon Slade Foundation (HSF17/6)
UNSW School of Biological Earth and Environmental Sciences (S.J.B.)
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30130302

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
Open Access Collection
GTP Research
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 96 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 01 Oct 2019, 08:23:44 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.