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Serologic evidence of exposure to highly pathogenic avian influenza H5 viruses in migratory shorebirds, Australia

Wille, Michelle, Lisovski, Simeon, Risely, Alice, Ferenczi, Marta, Roshier, David, Wong, Frank Y. K., Breed, Andrew C., Klaassen, Marcel and Hurt, Aeron C. 2019, Serologic evidence of exposure to highly pathogenic avian influenza H5 viruses in migratory shorebirds, Australia, Emerging infectious diseases, vol. 25, no. 10, pp. 1903-1910, doi: 10.3201/eid2510.190699.

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Title Serologic evidence of exposure to highly pathogenic avian influenza H5 viruses in migratory shorebirds, Australia
Author(s) Wille, Michelle
Lisovski, Simeon
Risely, Alice
Ferenczi, Marta
Roshier, David
Wong, Frank Y. K.
Breed, Andrew C.
Klaassen, MarcelORCID iD for Klaassen, Marcel orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Hurt, Aeron C.
Journal name Emerging infectious diseases
Volume number 25
Issue number 10
Start page 1903
End page 1910
Total pages 8
Publisher Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Place of publication Atlanta, Ga.
Publication date 2019-10
ISSN 1080-6059
Keyword(s) Australia
H5
HPAI
Pacific black duck
avian influenza
clade 2.3.4.4
highly pathogenic
influenza A virus
red-necked stint
serology
shorebirds
Summary Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5Nx viruses of the goose/Guangdong/96 lineage continue to cause outbreaks in poultry and wild birds globally. Shorebirds, known reservoirs of avian influenza viruses, migrate from Siberia to Australia along the East-Asian-Australasian Flyway. We examined whether migrating shorebirds spending nonbreeding seasons in Australia were exposed to HPAI H5 viruses. We compared those findings with those for a resident duck species. We screened >1,500 blood samples for nucleoprotein antibodies and tested positive samples for specific antibodies against 7 HPAI H5 virus antigens and 2 low pathogenicity avian influenza H5 virus antigens. We demonstrated the presence of hemagglutinin inhibitory antibodies against HPAI H5 virus clade 2.3.4.4 in the red-necked stint (Calidris ruficolis). We did not find hemagglutinin inhibitory antibodies in resident Pacific black ducks (Anas superciliosa). Our study highlights the potential role of long-distance migratory shorebirds in intercontinental spread of HPAI H5 viruses.
Language eng
DOI 10.3201/eid2510.190699
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1108 Medical Microbiology
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2019, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30130436

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.