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Exercise, mood, self-efficacy, and social support as predictors of depressive symptoms in older adults: direct and interaction effects

Miller, Kyle J., Mesagno, Christopher, McLaren, Suzanne, Grace, Fergal, Yates, Mark and Gomez, Rapson 2019, Exercise, mood, self-efficacy, and social support as predictors of depressive symptoms in older adults: direct and interaction effects, Frontiers in psychology, vol. 10, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02145.

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Title Exercise, mood, self-efficacy, and social support as predictors of depressive symptoms in older adults: direct and interaction effects
Author(s) Miller, Kyle J.
Mesagno, Christopher
McLaren, Suzanne
Grace, Fergal
Yates, MarkORCID iD for Yates, Mark orcid.org/0000-0001-5845-138X
Gomez, Rapson
Journal name Frontiers in psychology
Volume number 10
Article ID 2145
Total pages 11
Publisher Frontiers
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2019-09-19
ISSN 1664-1078
Keyword(s) Social Sciences
Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Psychology
elderly
seniors
physical activity
depression
hierarchical regression
moderation
interaction
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE
CLINICAL DEPRESSION
LATE-LIFE
HEALTH
CHAMPS
PREVALENCE
VALIDITY
OUTCOMES
COMORBIDITY
POPULATION
Summary © 2019 Miller, Mesagno, McLaren, Grace, Yates and Gomez. Background: Depression is a chronic condition that affects up to 15% of older adults. The healthogenic effects of regular exercise are well established, but it is still unclear which exercise-related variables characterise the antidepressant effects of exercise. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which exercise-related variables (exercise behaviour, exercise-induced mood, exercise self-efficacy, and social support) can predict depressive symptoms in a cohort of community-dwelling older adults. Methods: This study employed a cross-sectional analysis of questionnaire data from a sample of 586 community-dwelling older Australians aged 65 to 96 years old. Participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, modified CHAMPS Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Adults, Four-Dimension Mood Scale, Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale, and Social Provisions Scale – Short Form. Bivariate correlations were performed, and hierarchical multiple regression was subsequently used to test the regression model. Results: Exercise behaviour, exercise-induced mood, exercise self-efficacy, and social support were all negatively associated with depressive symptoms (r = −0.20 to −0.56). When the variables were entered as predictors into the hierarchical multiple regression model, social support was the strongest predictor of depressive symptoms (β = −0.42), followed by exercise-induced mood (β = −0.23), and exercise self-efficacy (β = −0.07). Exercise behaviour did not explain any additional variance in depressive symptoms. A modest interaction effect was also observed between exercise-induced mood and social support. Conclusion: These findings indicate that social support is the strongest predictor of depressive symptomology in community-dwelling older adults, particularly when combined with positive exercise-induced mood states. When addressing the needs of older adults at risk of depression, healthcare professionals should consider the implementation of exercise programmes that are likely to benefit older adults by improving mood, enhancing self-efficacy, and building social support.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02145
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30130732

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.