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Validation and acceptability of a cuffless wrist-worn wearable blood pressure monitoring device among users and health care professionals: mixed methods study

Shariful Islam, Sheikh Mohammed, Cartledge, Susie, Karmakar, Chandan, Rawstorn, Jonathan Charles, Fraser, Steve F., Chow, Clara and Maddison, Ralph 2019, Validation and acceptability of a cuffless wrist-worn wearable blood pressure monitoring device among users and health care professionals: mixed methods study, JMIR mHealth and uHealth, vol. 7, no. 10, pp. e14706-e14706, doi: 10.2196/14706.

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Title Validation and acceptability of a cuffless wrist-worn wearable blood pressure monitoring device among users and health care professionals: mixed methods study
Author(s) Shariful Islam, Sheikh MohammedORCID iD for Shariful Islam, Sheikh Mohammed orcid.org/0000-0001-7926-9368
Cartledge, SusieORCID iD for Cartledge, Susie orcid.org/0000-0002-6837-2244
Karmakar, ChandanORCID iD for Karmakar, Chandan orcid.org/0000-0003-1814-0856
Rawstorn, Jonathan CharlesORCID iD for Rawstorn, Jonathan Charles orcid.org/0000-0002-9755-7993
Fraser, Steve F.ORCID iD for Fraser, Steve F. orcid.org/0000-0003-0202-9619
Chow, Clara
Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Journal name JMIR mHealth and uHealth
Volume number 7
Issue number 10
Start page e14706
End page e14706
Publisher JMIR Publications
Place of publication Toronto, Ont.
Publication date 2019
ISSN 2291-5222
2291-5222
Keyword(s) hypertension
cardiovascular disease
wearable device
blood pressure
ambulatory blood pressure monitoring
Wearable Devices
Cardiovascular Diseases
Digital Health
mHealth
Sensors
Summary Background: Blood pressure (BP) is an important modifiable cardiovascular risk factor, yet its long-term monitoring remains problematic. Wearable cuffless devices enable the capture of multiple BP measures during everyday activities and could improve BP monitoring, but little is known about their validity or acceptability.Objective: This study aimed to validate a wrist-worn cuffless wearable BP device (Model T2; TMART Technologies Limited) and assess its acceptability among users and health care professionals.Methods: A mixed methods study was conducted to examine the validity and comparability of a wearable cuffless BP device against ambulatory and home devices. BP was measured simultaneously over 24 hours using wearable and ambulatory devices and over 7 days using wearable and home devices. Pearson correlation coefficients compared the degree of association between the measures, and limits of agreement (LOA; Bland-Altman plots) were generated to assess measurement bias. Semistructured interviews were conducted with users and 10 health care professionals to assess acceptability, facilitators, and barriers to using the wearable device. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed.Results: A total of 9090 BP measurements were collected from 20 healthy volunteers (mean 20.3 years, SD 5.4; N=10 females). Mean (SD) systolic BP (SBP)/diastolic BP (DBP) measured using the ambulatory (24 hours), home (7 days), and wearable (7 days) devices were 126 (SD 10)/75 (SD 6) mm Hg, 112 (SD 10)/71 (SD 9) mm Hg and 125 (SD 4)/77 (SD 3) mm Hg, respectively. Mean (LOA) biases and precision between the wearable and ambulatory devices over 24 hours were 0.5 (−10.1 to 11.1) mm Hg for SBP and 2.24 (−17.6 to 13.1) mm Hg for DBP. The mean biases (LOA) and precision between the wearable and home device over 7 days were −12.7 (−28.7 to 3.4) mm Hg for SBP and −5.6 (−20.5 to 9.2) mm Hg for DBP. The wearable BP device was well accepted by participants who found the device easy to wear and use. Both participants and health care providers agreed that the wearable cuffless devices were easy to use and that they could be used to improve BP monitoring.Conclusions: Wearable BP measures compared well against a gold-standard ambulatory device, indicating potential for this user-friendly method to augment BP management, particularly by enabling long-term monitoring that could improve treatment titration and increase understanding of users’ BP response during daily activity and stressors.
Language eng
DOI 10.2196/14706
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful Islam, Susie Cartledge, Chandan Karmakar, Jonathan Charles Rawstorn, Steve F Fraser, Clara Chow, Ralph Maddison
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30130777

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.