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Education and lifestyle predict change in dietary patterns and diet quality of adults 55 years and over

Thorpe, Maree G., Milte, Catherine M., Crawford, David and McNaughton, Sarah A. 2019, Education and lifestyle predict change in dietary patterns and diet quality of adults 55 years and over, Nutrition journal, vol. 18, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1186/s12937-019-0495-6.

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Title Education and lifestyle predict change in dietary patterns and diet quality of adults 55 years and over
Author(s) Thorpe, Maree G.
Milte, Catherine M.ORCID iD for Milte, Catherine M. orcid.org/0000-0003-0035-6405
Crawford, DavidORCID iD for Crawford, David orcid.org/0000-0002-2467-7556
McNaughton, Sarah A.ORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Journal name Nutrition journal
Volume number 18
Article ID 67
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2019-11-07
ISSN 1475-2891
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Diet quality
Principal component analysis
Dietary patterns
Older adults
Predictors of change
Cohort
CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
SELF-PERCEIVED HEALTH
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
AUSTRALIAN ADULTS
CLUSTER-ANALYSIS
SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS
CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
LONGITUDINAL CHANGES
MARITAL TRANSITIONS
EATING PATTERNS
Summary Background: Diet is a key risk factor for chronic disease, and an increasing concern among older adults. We aim to examine the changes in dietary patterns using principal component analysis and a diet quality index among older adults and examine the predictors of dietary change over a 4 year period. Methods: Data was obtained via a postal survey in a prospective cohort, the Wellbeing Eating and Exercise for a Long Life (WELL) study. Australian adults aged 55 years and over (n = 1005 men and n = 1106 women) completed a food frequency at three time points and provided self-reported personal characteristics. Principal component analysis was used to assess dietary patterns and diet quality was assessed using the 2013 Revised Dietary Guideline Index. The relationships between predictors and change in dietary patterns were assessed by multiple linear regression. Results: Two dietary patterns were consistently identified in men and women at three time points over 4 years. One was characterised by vegetables, fruit and white meat, and the other was characterised by red and processed meat and processed foods. Reduced consumption of key food groups within the principal component analysis-determined dietary patterns was observed. An increase in diet quality over 4 years was observed in men only. Reported higher education levels and favourable lifestyle characteristics, including not smoking and physical activity, at baseline predicted an increase in healthier dietary patterns over 4 years. Conclusions: There was stability in the main dietary patterns identified over time, however participants reported an overall decrease in the frequency of consumption of key food groups. Compliance with the Australian Dietary Guidelines remained poor and therefore targeting this population in nutritional initiatives is important. Design of nutrition promotion for older adults need to consider those with lower socioeconomic status, as having a lower level of education was a predictor of poorer dietary patterns. It is important to consider how nutrition behaviours can be targeted alongside other lifestyle behaviours, such as smoking and inadequate physical activity to improve health.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12937-019-0495-6
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID ARC DP 1095595
ARC FT 100100581
NHMRC CDF 1104636
Copyright notice ©2019, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30131608

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.