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Multimorbidity prevalence and pattern in Indonesian adults: an exploratory study using national survey data

Hussain, Mohammad Akhtar, Huxley, Rachel R. and Al Mamun, Abdullah 2015, Multimorbidity prevalence and pattern in Indonesian adults: an exploratory study using national survey data, BMJ open, vol. 5, no. 12, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009810.

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Title Multimorbidity prevalence and pattern in Indonesian adults: an exploratory study using national survey data
Author(s) Hussain, Mohammad Akhtar
Huxley, Rachel R.ORCID iD for Huxley, Rachel R. orcid.org/0000-0002-2705-6616
Al Mamun, Abdullah
Journal name BMJ open
Volume number 5
Issue number 12
Total pages 10
Publisher BMJ Publishing
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-01
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
multiple chronic conditions
multiple morbidities
risk factors
chronic diseases
PUBLIC HEALTH
HEALTH-CARE UTILIZATION
EPIDEMIOLOGY
DETERMINANTS
EXPENDITURES
INEQUALITIES
COMORBIDITY
POPULATION
DISEASES
CHOICE
IMPACT
Summary Objectives: To estimate the prevalence and pattern of multimorbidity in the Indonesian adult population. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Community-based survey. The sampling frame was based on households in 13 of the 27 Indonesian provinces, representing about 83% of the Indonesian population. Participants: 9438 Indonesian adults aged 40 years and above. Main outcome measures: Prevalence and pattern of multimorbidity by age, gender and socioeconomic status. Results: The mean number of morbidities in the sample was 1.27 (SE±0.01). The overall age and sex standardised prevalence of multimorbidity was 35.7% (34.8% to 36.7%), with women having significantly higher prevalence of multimorbidity than men (41.5% vs 29.5%; p≤0.001). Of those with multimorbidity, 64.6% (62.8% to 66.3%) were aged less than 60 years. Prevalence of multimorbidity was positively associated with age (p≤0.001) and affluence (p ≤0.001) and significantly greater in women at all ages compared with men. For each 5-year increment in age there was an approximate 20% greater risk of multimorbidity in both sexes (18% in women 95% CI 1.14 to 1.22 and 22% in men 95% CI 1.18 to 1.26). Increasing age, female gender, non-Javanese ethnicity, and high per-capital expenditure were all significantly associated with higher odds of multimorbidity. The combination of hypertension with cardiac diseases, hypercholesterolemia, arthritis, and uric acid/gout were the most commonly occurring disease pairs in both sexes. Conclusions: More than one-third of the Indonesian adult population are living with multimorbidity with women and the more wealthy being particularly affected. Of especial concern was the high prevalence of multimorbidity among younger individuals. Hypertension was the most frequently occurring condition common to most individuals with multimorbidity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009810
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30131898

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
PVC's Office - Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.