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Sex differences in body anthropometry and composition in individuals with and without diabetes in the UK Biobank

Peters, Sanne A. E., Huxley, Rachel R. and Woodward, Mark 2016, Sex differences in body anthropometry and composition in individuals with and without diabetes in the UK Biobank, BMJ open, vol. 6, no. 1, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010007.

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Title Sex differences in body anthropometry and composition in individuals with and without diabetes in the UK Biobank
Author(s) Peters, Sanne A. E.
Huxley, Rachel R.ORCID iD for Huxley, Rachel R. orcid.org/0000-0002-2705-6616
Woodward, Mark
Journal name BMJ open
Volume number 6
Issue number 1
Total pages 7
Publisher BMJ Open
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
RISK-FACTORS
64 COHORTS
WOMEN
MEN
METAANALYSIS
OBESITY
OVERWEIGHT
MORTALITY
MELLITUS
DIABETES & ENDOCRINOLOGY
EPIDEMIOLOGY
Summary Objective: Type I and II diabetes are associated with a greater relative risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in women than in men. Sex differences in adiposity storage may explain these findings. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 480 813 participants from the UK Biobank without history of CVD was conducted to assess whether the difference in body size in people with and without diabetes was greater in women than in men. Age-adjusted linear regression analyses were used to obtain the mean difference in women minus men in the difference in body size measures, separately for type I and II diabetes. Results: Body size was higher in individuals with diabetes than in individuals without diabetes, particularly in type II diabetes. Differences in body size between individuals with and without type II diabetes were more extreme in women than in men; compared to those without type II diabetes, body mass index and waist circumference were 1.94 (95% CI 1.82 to 2.07) and 4.84 (4.53 to 5.16) higher in women than in men, respectively. In type I diabetes, body size differed to a similar extent between those with and without diabetes in women as in men. This pattern was observed across all prespecified subgroups. Conclusions: Differences in body size associated with diabetes were significantly greater in women than in men in type II diabetes but not in type I diabetes. Prospective studies can determine whether sex differences in body size associated with diabetes underpin some of the excess risk for CVD in women with type II diabetes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010007
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30131908

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
PVC's Office - Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.