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Is food store type associated with the consumption of ultra-processed food and drink products in Brazil?

Pereira Machado, Priscila, Claro, Rafael Moreira, Martins, Ana Paula Bortoletto, Costa, Janaína Calu and Levy, Renata Bertazzi 2018, Is food store type associated with the consumption of ultra-processed food and drink products in Brazil?, Public health nutrition, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 201-209, doi: 10.1017/S1368980017001410.

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Title Is food store type associated with the consumption of ultra-processed food and drink products in Brazil?
Author(s) Pereira Machado, PriscilaORCID iD for Pereira Machado, Priscila orcid.org/0000-0003-4607-5094
Claro, Rafael Moreira
Martins, Ana Paula Bortoletto
Costa, Janaína Calu
Levy, Renata Bertazzi
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 21
Issue number 1
Start page 201
End page 209
Total pages 9
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2018-01
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Nutrition & Dietetics
Food processing
Retail
Grocery shopping
Food supply
Food purchase
Household budget survey
DEVELOPING-COUNTRIES
OBESITY PREVENTION
SUPERMARKETS
ENVIRONMENT
NUTRITION
INDEX
AVAILABILITY
PATTERNS
POLICIES
SYSTEM
Summary Objective To analyse the association between food store type and the consumption of ultra-processed products in Brazil. Design Data from the 2008-2009 Household Budget Survey involving a probabilistic sample of 55 970 Brazilian households. Food stores were grouped into nine categories. Foods and drinks were grouped according to characteristics of food processing. The contribution of each food store type to the total energy acquired from each food processing group, and according to quintiles of consumption of ultra-processed products, was estimated. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to identify a pattern of food store usage. Linear regression models were performed to estimate the relationship between the purchase pattern and the consumption of ultra-processed products. Results In line with their larger market share, supermarkets accounted for 59 % of total energy and participated most in acquisition for three food groups, with emphasis on ultra-processed products (60·4 % of energy). The participation of supermarkets in total purchase tended to increase in populations with higher consumption of ultra-processed products, while the participation of small markets and small producers tended to decrease. The purchase pattern characterized by use of traditional retail (street fairs and vendors, small markets, small farmers, butcheries) was associated with a smaller consumption of ultra-processed products. Conclusions Food policies and interventions aiming to reduce the consumption of ultra-processed products should consider the influence of supermarkets on the consumption of these products. A purchase pattern based on traditional retail constitutes an important tool for promoting healthy eating in Brazil.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S1368980017001410
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30131947

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.