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Does the effect of disability acquisition on mental health differ by employment characteristics? A longitudinal fixed-effects analysis

Aitken, Zoe, Simpson, Julie Anne, Bentley, Rebecca, Milner, Allison, LaMontagne, Anthony and Kavanagh, Anne Marie 2019, Does the effect of disability acquisition on mental health differ by employment characteristics? A longitudinal fixed-effects analysis, Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology, doi: 10.1007/s00127-019-01783-x.

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Title Does the effect of disability acquisition on mental health differ by employment characteristics? A longitudinal fixed-effects analysis
Author(s) Aitken, Zoe
Simpson, Julie Anne
Bentley, Rebecca
Milner, AllisonORCID iD for Milner, Allison orcid.org/0000-0003-4657-0503
LaMontagne, AnthonyORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Kavanagh, Anne Marie
Journal name Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology
Publisher Springer
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2019-10
ISSN 0933-7954
1433-9285
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
Mental health
Disability
Social epidemiology
Health inequalities
Employment
Effect modification
SOCIAL SUPPORT
SF-36
POPULATION
DEPRESSION
DISORDERS
VALIDITY
5-ITEM
COHORT
TESTS
ONSET
Summary © 2019, The Author(s). Purpose: Longitudinal studies have suggested a causal relationship between disability acquisition and mental health, but there is substantial heterogeneity in the magnitude of the effect. Previous studies have provided evidence that socioeconomic characteristics can buffer the effect but have not examined the role of employment characteristics. Methods: We used data from 17 annual waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey to compare the mental health of working age individuals before and after disability acquisition, using the Mental Health Inventory, a subscale of the SF-36 health questionnaire. Linear fixed-effects regression models were used to estimate the effect of disability acquisition on mental health. We tested for effect modification by two characteristics of people’s employment prior to disability acquisition: occupational skill level and contract type. Multiple imputation using chained equations was used to handle missing data. Results: Disability acquisition was associated with a substantial decline in mental health score (estimated mean difference: − 4.3, 95% CI − 5.0, − 3.5). There was evidence of effect modification by occupational skill level, with the largest effects seen for those in low-skilled jobs (− 6.1, 95% CI − 7.6, − 4.5), but not for contract type. Conclusions: The findings highlight the need for social and health policies that focus on increasing employment rates, improving the sustainability of employment, and providing employment services and education and training opportunities for people who acquire a disability, particularly for people in low-skilled occupations, to reduce the mental health inequalities experienced by people with disabilities.
Notes In press
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00127-019-01783-x
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1702 Cognitive Sciences
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30131970

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.