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Positive reinforcement by general practitioners is associated with greater physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes

Geerling, Ralph, Browne, Jessica L., Holmes-Truscott, Elizabeth, Furler, John, Speight, Jane and Mosely, Kylie 2019, Positive reinforcement by general practitioners is associated with greater physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes, BMJ open diabetes research and care, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2019-000701.

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Title Positive reinforcement by general practitioners is associated with greater physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes
Author(s) Geerling, Ralph
Browne, Jessica L.ORCID iD for Browne, Jessica L. orcid.org/0000-0001-7294-8114
Holmes-Truscott, ElizabethORCID iD for Holmes-Truscott, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0001-9139-4663
Furler, John
Speight, JaneORCID iD for Speight, Jane orcid.org/0000-0002-1204-6896
Mosely, Kylie
Journal name BMJ open diabetes research and care
Volume number 7
Issue number 1
Article ID e000701
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BMJ Open
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2019
ISSN 2052-4897
Keyword(s) Behavioral Change
Physical Activity
Primary Care
Type 2 Diabetes
Summary Objective In a sample of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the aim of this study was to examine whether self-reported physical activity level is associated with recall of specific physical activity-related interactions used by general practitioners (GP). Research design and methods Adults with T2DM completed an online survey reporting physical activity behaviors and recall of 14 GP-patient interactions about physical activity, mapped onto discrete behavior change techniques (BCT). Stepped logistical regression examined associations between recommended physical activity (≥600 MET-min/week) and GP-patient interactions, controlling for body mass index, diabetes-related comorbidities, depressive symptoms and self-efficacy. Results In total, 381 respondents (55% men, mean±SD age: 62±10 years and T2DM duration 8±8 years) provided complete data. Most (73%) reported receiving 'general advice', while interactions related to goal setting, monitoring, and relapse prevention were least commonly reported (all <20%). Self-reported achievement of the recommended physical activity level was significantly associated with recall of GP interactions involving praise for 'efforts to be active' (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.24 to 3.53), 'lost weight' (OR 1.81; 95% CI 1.05 to 3.12) or lowering 'glucose levels as a result of being active' (OR 1.75; 95% CI 1.03 to 2.96). Conclusions Findings suggest GPS can be somewhat effective in promoting physical activity with simple, positive, reinforcing messages/interactions. Future research to develop and evaluate very brief primary care BCT-based physical activity interventions is needed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjdrc-2019-000701
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30132531

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.