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Association between dairy intake and fracture in an Australian-based cohort of women: a prospective study

Aslam, Hajara, Holloway-Kew, Kara L, Mohebbi, Mohammadreza, Jacka, Felice N and Pasco, Julie A. 2019, Association between dairy intake and fracture in an Australian-based cohort of women: a prospective study, BMJ Open, vol. 9, no. 11, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-031594.

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Title Association between dairy intake and fracture in an Australian-based cohort of women: a prospective study
Author(s) Aslam, Hajara
Holloway-Kew, Kara LORCID iD for Holloway-Kew, Kara L orcid.org/0000-0001-5064-2990
Mohebbi, MohammadrezaORCID iD for Mohebbi, Mohammadreza orcid.org/0000-0001-9713-7211
Jacka, Felice NORCID iD for Jacka, Felice N orcid.org/0000-0002-9825-0328
Pasco, Julie A.ORCID iD for Pasco, Julie A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 9
Issue number 11
Article ID e031594
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BMJ
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2019-11
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) dairy
fractures
inflammation
milk
osteoporosis
Summary Objective Given the inconsistent evidence on dairy consumption and risk of fracture, we assessed the association between milk/total dairy consumption and major osteoporotic fracture (MOF) in women from the Geelong Osteoporosis Study (GOS). Methods Women aged ≥50 years (n=833) were followed from baseline (1993-1997) to date of first fracture, death or 31 December 2017, whichever occurred first. Dairy consumption was assessed by self-report at baseline and the follow-up phases. MOFs (hip, forearm, clinical spine and proximal humerus) were confirmed radiologically. Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine associations between milk/total dairy (milk, cheese, yoghurt, ice cream) consumption and MOFs. Cross-sectional associations between milk/total dairy consumption and serum high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP), C-terminal telopeptide (CTx) and procollagen type 1 N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) at baseline were investigated using multivariable linear regression. Results During follow-up (11 507 person-years), 206 women had an MOF. Consuming >500 mL/d of milk was not significantly associated with increased HR for MOF. Non-milk (1.56; 95% CI 0.99 to 2.46) drinkers and consumption of ≥800 g/d total dairy (1.70; 95% CI 0.99 to 2.93) had marginally higher HR for MOF compared with consuming <250 mL/d of milk and 200-399 g/d of total dairy, respectively. Milk consumption was inversely associated with serum hsCRP and CTx, but total dairy consumption was not associated with these serum markers. Conclusion Higher milk consumption did not increase the risk for MOF in older women. However, a trend for increased MOF was detected in zero milk and higher total dairy consuming women.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-031594
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, Author(s) (or their employer(s))
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30132698

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
PVC's Office - Health
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.