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Increased adaptive variation despite reduced overall genetic diversity in a rapidly adapting invader

Selechnik, Daniel, Richardson, Mark F., Shine, Richard, DeVore, Jayna L., Ducatez, Simon and Rollins, Lee A. 2019, Increased adaptive variation despite reduced overall genetic diversity in a rapidly adapting invader, Frontiers in genetics, vol. 10, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.3389/fgene.2019.01221.

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Title Increased adaptive variation despite reduced overall genetic diversity in a rapidly adapting invader
Author(s) Selechnik, Daniel
Richardson, Mark F.ORCID iD for Richardson, Mark F. orcid.org/0000-0002-1650-0064
Shine, Richard
DeVore, Jayna L.
Ducatez, Simon
Rollins, Lee A.ORCID iD for Rollins, Lee A. orcid.org/0000-0002-3279-7005
Journal name Frontiers in genetics
Volume number 10
Article ID 1221
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2019
ISSN 1664-8021
1664-8021
Keyword(s) Bufo marinus
Rhinella marina
evolution
invasive species
ribonucleic acid sequencing
genetic paradox of invasion
Summary Invasive species often evolve rapidly following introduction despite genetic bottlenecks that may result from small numbers of founders; however, some invasions may not fit this “genetic paradox”. The invasive cane toad (Rhinella marina) displays high phenotypic variation across its introduced Australian range. Here, we used three genome-wide datasets to characterize their population structure and genetic diversity. We found that toads form three genetic clusters: 1) native range toads, 2) toads from the source population in Hawaii and long-established areas near introduction sites in Australia, and 3) toads from more recently established northern Australian sites. Although we find an overall reduction in genetic diversity following introduction, we do not see this reduction in loci putatively under selection, suggesting that genetic diversity may have been maintained at ecologically relevant traits, or that mutation rates were high enough to maintain adaptive potential. Nonetheless, toads encounter novel environmental challenges in Australia, and the transition between genetic clusters occurs at a point along the invasion transect where temperature rises and rainfall decreases. We identify environmentally associated loci known to be involved in resistance to heat and dehydration. This study highlights that natural selection occurs rapidly and plays a vital role in shaping the structure of invasive populations.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fgene.2019.01221
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, Selechnik, Richardson, Shine, DeVore, Ducatez and Rollins
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30132906

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.