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Associations between dietary patterns and blood pressure in a sample of Australian adults

Margerison, Claire, Riddell, Lynette J., McNaughton, Sarah A. and Nowson, Caryl A. 2020, Associations between dietary patterns and blood pressure in a sample of Australian adults, Nutrition journal, vol. 19, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12937-019-0519-2.

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Title Associations between dietary patterns and blood pressure in a sample of Australian adults
Author(s) Margerison, ClaireORCID iD for Margerison, Claire orcid.org/0000-0002-2722-6128
Riddell, Lynette J.ORCID iD for Riddell, Lynette J. orcid.org/0000-0002-0688-2134
McNaughton, Sarah A.ORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Nowson, Caryl A.ORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl A. orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Journal name Nutrition journal
Volume number 19
Article ID 5
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-01
ISSN 1475-2891
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Dietary patterns
Factor analysis
Blood pressure
Sodium
Potassium
24-h recall
CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
SALT REDUCTION
HYPERTENSION
METAANALYSIS
MORTALITY
PREVENTION
FREQUENCY
Summary BACKGROUND: Investigating effects of whole diets on blood pressure (BP) can contribute to development of diet-based recommendations for health. Our aim was to assess the relationship between dietary patterns and BP in a sample of free-living Australian adults. METHODS: Usual dietary patterns of participants recruited to dietary intervention studies were assessed using factor analysis (two 24-h recalls). The mean of seven days of daily, seated BP measurements were used. RESULTS: Complete data from 251 participants (112 males; mean age 55.1(9.1) (SD) years; body mass index (BMI) 29.5(3.9) kg/m2) was included. Three dietary patterns were identified. Only Dietary Pattern 2 was positively associated with home systolic BP (β = 1.88, 95% CI 0.16, 3.60) after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, anti-hypertensive medication, smoking, education, physical activity and energy intake. This dietary pattern was characterised by high consumption of low-fibre bread, pasta, noodles and rice, meat dishes, poultry dishes and egg dishes, mixed cereal dishes, salted nuts and low consumption of milk and yoghurt (low-fat), vegetable juice, vegetables and high-fibre bread. Dietary Pattern 2 was also positively associated with intakes of energy (P = 0.002) and sodium (P = 0.005) and inversely associated with potassium intake (P = 0.002). After adjustment for energy, only the inverse association with potassium remained (P <  0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of Australian adults, Dietary Pattern 2 was associated with higher BP and thus chronic disease risk, supporting the evidence that diets high in energy and sodium, and low in potassium from vegetables and dairy, are detrimental to cardiovascular health.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12937-019-0519-2
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID NHMRC 1104636
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30133649

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.