The political construction of public health nutrition problems: a framing analysis of parliamentary debates on junk-food marketing to children in Australia

Russell, Cherie, Lawrence, Mark, Cullerton, Katherine and Baker, Phillip 2020, The political construction of public health nutrition problems: a framing analysis of parliamentary debates on junk-food marketing to children in Australia, Public health nutrition, vol. 23, no. 11, pp. 2041-2052, doi: 10.1017/S1368980019003628.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The political construction of public health nutrition problems: a framing analysis of parliamentary debates on junk-food marketing to children in Australia
Author(s) Russell, CherieORCID iD for Russell, Cherie orcid.org/0000-0003-1251-4810
Lawrence, MarkORCID iD for Lawrence, Mark orcid.org/0000-0001-6899-3983
Cullerton, Katherine
Baker, PhillipORCID iD for Baker, Phillip orcid.org/0000-0002-0802-2349
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 23
Issue number 11
Start page 2041
End page 2052
Total pages 12
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2020-08
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Nutrition & Dietetics
Framing
Childhood obesity
Marketing
Junk food
Political priority
Ideology
Summary Objective: Junk-food marketing contributes significantly to childhood obesity, which in turn imposes major health and economic burdens. Despite this, political priority for addressing junk-food marketing has been weak in many countries. Competing interests, worldviews and beliefs of stakeholders involved with the issue contribute to this political inertia. An integral group of actors for driving policy change are parliamentarians, who champion policy and enact legislation. However, how parliamentarians interpret and portray (i.e. frame) the causes and solutions of public health nutrition problems is poorly understood. The present study aimed to understand how Australian parliamentarians from different political parties frame the problem of junk-food marketing.Design: Framing analysis of transcripts from the Australian Government’s Parliamentary Hansard, involving development of a theoretical framework, data collection, coding transcripts and thematic synthesis of results. Settings: Australia.Participants: None.Results: Parliamentarian framing generally reflected political party ideology. Liberal parliamentarians called for minimal government regulation and greater personal responsibility, reflecting the party’s core values of liberalism and neoliberalism. Greens parliamentarians framed the issue as systemic, highlighting the need for government intervention and reflecting the core party value of social justice. Labor parliamentarians used both frames at varying times.Conclusions: Parliamentarians’ framing was generally consistent with their party ideology, though subject to changes over time. This project provides insights into the role of framing and ideology in shaping public health policy responses and may inform communication strategies for nutrition advocates. Advocates might consider using frames that resonate with the ideologies of different political parties and adapting these over time.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S1368980019003628
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30133692

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 36 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 20 Jan 2020, 10:32:14 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.