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Tensiomyography derived parameters reflect skeletal muscle architectural adaptations following 6-weeks of lower body resistance training

Wilson, Matthew T., Ryan, Andrew M. F., Vallance, Scott R., Dias-Dougan, Alastair, Dugdale, James H., Hunter, Angus M., Hamilton, D. Lee and Macgregor, Lewis J. 2019, Tensiomyography derived parameters reflect skeletal muscle architectural adaptations following 6-weeks of lower body resistance training, Frontiers in physiology, vol. 10, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.3389/fphys.2019.01493.

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Title Tensiomyography derived parameters reflect skeletal muscle architectural adaptations following 6-weeks of lower body resistance training
Author(s) Wilson, Matthew T.
Ryan, Andrew M. F.
Vallance, Scott R.
Dias-Dougan, Alastair
Dugdale, James H.
Hunter, Angus M.
Hamilton, D. LeeORCID iD for Hamilton, D. Lee orcid.org/0000-0002-5620-4788
Macgregor, Lewis J.
Journal name Frontiers in physiology
Volume number 10
Article ID 1493
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Frontiers
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2019-12
ISSN 1664-042X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physiology
muscle architecture
pennation angle
resistance training
tensiomyography
skeletal muscle hypertrophy
SHEAR-WAVE ELASTOGRAPHY
BARBELL HIP THRUST
MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES
RECTUS FEMORIS
RADIAL DISPLACEMENT
BICEPS FEMORIS
EMG ACTIVITY
BACK SQUAT
STRENGTH
PERFORMANCE
Summary Measurement of muscle specific contractile properties in response to resistance training (RT) can provide practitioners valuable information regarding physiological status of individuals. Field based measurements of such contractile properties within specific muscle groups, could be beneficial when monitoring efficacy of training or rehabilitation interventions. Tensiomyography (TMG) quantifies contractile properties of individual muscles via an electrically stimulated twitch contraction and may serve as a viable option in the aforementioned applications. Thus, aims of this study were; (i) to investigate the potential use of TMG to quantify training adaptations and differences, in response to exercise specific lower limb RT; and (ii) investigate any associations between TMG parameters and accompanying muscle architectural measures. Non-resistance trained male participants (n = 33) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 single-exercise intervention groups (n = 11 per group); back squat (BS), deadlift (DL), or hip thrust (HT). Participants completed a 6-week linearized training program (2× per week), where the assigned exercise was the sole method of lower body training. Pre- and post-intervention testing of maximal dynamic strength was assessed by one repetition maximum (1RM) of BS, DL, and HT. Radial muscle belly displacement (Dm) and contraction time (Tc) were obtained via TMG from the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) pre- and post-intervention, alongside muscle architectural measures (pennation angle and muscle thickness). All three groups displayed significant increases all 1RM strength tests (p < 0.001; pη2 = 0.677–0.753). Strength increases were accompanied by significant overall increases in RF muscle thickness (p < 0.001, pη2 = 0.969), and pennation angle (p = 0.007, pη2 = 0.220). Additionally, an overall reduction in RF Dm (p < 0.001, pη2 = 0.427) was observed. Significant negative relationships were observed between RF Dm and pennation angle (p = 0.003, r = −0.36), and with RF Dm and muscle thickness (p < 0.001, r = −0.50). These findings indicate that TMG is able to detect improved contractile properties, alongside improvements in muscle function within an untrained population. Furthermore, the observed associations between Dm and muscle architecture suggest that TMG contractile property assessments could be used to obtain information on muscle geometry.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2019.01493
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30133694

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.