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What hinders and helps academics to conduct dissemination and implementation (D&I) research in the field of nutrition and physical activity? An international perspective

Koorts, Harriet, Naylor, Patti-Jean, Laws, Rachel, Love, Penelope, Maple, Jaimie-Lee and van Nassau, Femke 2020, What hinders and helps academics to conduct dissemination and implementation (D&I) research in the field of nutrition and physical activity? An international perspective, The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 17, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12966-020-0909-z.

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Title What hinders and helps academics to conduct dissemination and implementation (D&I) research in the field of nutrition and physical activity? An international perspective
Author(s) Koorts, HarrietORCID iD for Koorts, Harriet orcid.org/0000-0003-1303-6064
Naylor, Patti-Jean
Laws, RachelORCID iD for Laws, Rachel orcid.org/0000-0003-4328-1116
Love, PenelopeORCID iD for Love, Penelope orcid.org/0000-0002-1244-3947
Maple, Jaimie-Lee
van Nassau, Femke
Journal name The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 17
Article ID 1
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London. Eng.
Publication date 2020-01
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
Implementation
Dissemination
Translation
Physical activity
Nutrition
Academia
Barriers
Facilitators
Real-world
Summary BACKGROUND: Ineffective research-practice translation is a major challenge to population health improvement. This paper presents an international perspective on the barriers and facilitators associated with the uptake of and engagement in Dissemination and Implementation (D&I) research in the fields of physical activity and nutrition. METHODS: A mixed methods study involving participants from the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) network. Participants completed an online survey (May-July 2018) and/or participated in a focus group during the annual ISBNPA conference (June 2018). Descriptive statistics were generated for quantitative online and pre-focus group survey data. Fisher's exact tests investigated associations of (i) length of time in academia, (ii) career stage and (iii) country of work, and agreement with 'perceptions of D&I'. Qualitative data were analysed thematically. RESULTS: In total, 141 participants responded to the survey (76% female, 21% aged 35-39 years, 14 countries represented) and 25 participated in focus groups (n = 3). Participants self-identified as having knowledge (48%), skills (53%) and experience supporting others (40%) to conduct D&I research. The majority (96%) perceived D&I was important, with 66% having organizational support for D&I, yet only 52% reported prioritizing D&I research. Perceptions of D&I differed by length of time in academia, career stage and country of work. Barriers included: (i) lack of D&I expertise; (ii) lack of organisational support/value for D&I; (iii) embedded scientific beliefs/culture; (iv) methodological challenges with D&I research; (v) funding/publishing priorities and; (vi) academic performance structures. Facilitators included: (i) increased presence/value of D&I; (ii) collective advocacy; (iii) organisational support for D&I; (iv) recruitment of D&I scientists and; (v) restructure of academic performance models, funding/publishing criteria. CONCLUSIONS: Individual, organisational and system-wide factors hindered academics' engagement with and support for D&I research, which was perceived to reduce opportunities for research-practice translation. Factors were mostly consistent across countries and individual career stages/time spent in academia. Embedding D&I early within academic training, and system-wide reorientation of academic performance and funding structures to promote and facilitate D&I research, are some of the necessary actions to reduce the research-practice gap. Consistent with public health more broadly, these changes are long overdue in the fields of physical activity and nutrition.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-020-0909-z
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences
13 Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30133739

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.