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Why do some find it hard to disagree? An fMRI study

Domínguez D, Juan F., Taing, Sreyneth A. and Molenberghs, Pascal 2016, Why do some find it hard to disagree? An fMRI study, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, vol. 9, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2015.00718.

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Title Why do some find it hard to disagree? An fMRI study
Author(s) Domínguez D, Juan F.ORCID iD for Domínguez D, Juan F. orcid.org/0000-0002-6715-1060
Taing, Sreyneth A.
Molenberghs, Pascal
Journal name Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume number 9
Article ID 718
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2016-01-29
ISSN 1662-5161
Keyword(s) conflict
individual differences
expertise
cognitive dissonance
social neuroscience
posterior medial frontal cortex
anterior insula
Science & Technology
Social Sciences
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Neurosciences
Psychology
Neurosciences & Neurology
MEDIAL FRONTAL-CORTEX
HUMAN ORBITOFRONTAL CORTEX
INDUCED PREFERENCE CHANGE
EVENT-RELATED FMRI
COGNITIVE-DISSONANCE
SOCIAL CONFORMITY
ATTITUDE-CHANGE
INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES
SUPPLEMENTARY
MECHANISMS
Summary People often find it hard to disagree with others, but how this disposition varies across individuals or how it is influenced by social factors like other people’s level of expertise remains little understood. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we found that activity across a network of brain areas [comprising posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC), anterior insula (AI), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), lateral orbitofrontal cortex, and angular gyrus] was modulated by individual differences in the frequency with which participants actively disagreed with statements made by others. Specifically, participants who disagreed less frequently exhibited greater brain activation in these areas when they actually disagreed. Given the role of this network in cognitive dissonance, our results suggest that some participants had more trouble disagreeing due to a heightened cognitive dissonance response. Contrary to expectation, the level of expertise (high or low) had no effect on behavior or brain activity.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fnhum.2015.00718
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, Domínguez D, Taing and Molenberghs
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30133984

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.