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A study protocol for a randomised trial of adjunct computerised memory specificity training (c-MeST) for major depression in youth: targeting cognitive mechanisms to enhance usual care outcomes in mental health settings

Hallford, D. J., Carmichael, A. M., Austin, D. W., Takano, K., Raes, F. and Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, M. 2020, A study protocol for a randomised trial of adjunct computerised memory specificity training (c-MeST) for major depression in youth: targeting cognitive mechanisms to enhance usual care outcomes in mental health settings, Trials, vol. 21, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1186/s13063-019-4036-6.

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Title A study protocol for a randomised trial of adjunct computerised memory specificity training (c-MeST) for major depression in youth: targeting cognitive mechanisms to enhance usual care outcomes in mental health settings
Author(s) Hallford, D. J.ORCID iD for Hallford, D. J. orcid.org/0000-0003-1093-8345
Carmichael, A. M.
Austin, D. W.ORCID iD for Austin, D. W. orcid.org/0000-0002-1296-3555
Takano, K.
Raes, F.
Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, M.ORCID iD for Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, M. orcid.org/0000-0003-1145-6057
Journal name Trials
Volume number 21
Article ID 85
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1745-6215
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, Research & Experimental
Research & Experimental Medicine
Autobiographical memory
Depression
Memory specificity
Memory specificity training
Overgeneral memory
MeST
Online intervention
OVERGENERAL AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL MEMORY
DISORDERS
ANXIETY
ONSET
MOOD
INTERVENTION
RUMINATION
SYMPTOMS
ADULTS
YOUNG
Summary BACKGROUND: Youth depression is highly prevalent and is related to impairments in academic, social and behavioural functioning. Evidence-based treatments are available, but many young people do not respond or sufficiently recover with first-line options, and a significant proportion experience relapse. Consequently, there is clear scope to enhance intervention in this critical period of early-onset depression. Memory specificity training (MeST) is a low-intensity intervention for depression that targets reduced specificity when recalling memories of the past, a common cognitive vulnerability in depression. This randomised controlled trial will assess the efficacy of adding a computerised version of MeST (c-MeST) to usual care for youth depression. METHODS/DESIGN: Young people aged 15-25 years with a major depressive episode (MDE) will be recruited and randomised to have immediate access to the seven session online c-MeST program in addition to usual care, or to usual care and wait-list for c-MeST. The primary outcomes will be diagnostic status of an MDE and self-reported depressive symptoms assessed at baseline, 1-, 3- and 6-month intervals. Autobiographical memory specificity and other variables thought to contribute to the maintenance of reduced memory specificity and depression will be assessed as mediators of change. DISCUSSION: Online provision of c-MeST provides a simple, low-intensity option for targeting a cognitive vulnerability that predicts the persistence of depressive symptoms. If found to be efficacious as an adjunct to usual care for depressed youth, it could be suitable for broader roll-out, as c-MeST is highly accessible and implementation requires only minimal resources due to the online and automated nature of intervention. 
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s13063-019-4036-6
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1102 Cardiorespiratory Medicine and Haematology
1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30134150

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.