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Pathways to increasing adolescent physical activity and wellbeing: A mediation analysis of intervention components designed using a participatory approach

Corder, Kirsten, Werneck, Andre O., Jong, Stephanie T., Hoare, Erin, Brown, Helen Elizabeth, Foubister, Campbell, Wilkinson, Paul O. and van Sluijs, Esther M.F. 2020, Pathways to increasing adolescent physical activity and wellbeing: A mediation analysis of intervention components designed using a participatory approach, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 1-22, doi: 10.3390/ijerph17020390.

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Title Pathways to increasing adolescent physical activity and wellbeing: A mediation analysis of intervention components designed using a participatory approach
Author(s) Corder, Kirsten
Werneck, Andre O.
Jong, Stephanie T.
Hoare, ErinORCID iD for Hoare, Erin orcid.org/0000-0001-6186-0221
Brown, Helen Elizabeth
Foubister, Campbell
Wilkinson, Paul O.
van Sluijs, Esther M.F.
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume number 17
Issue number 2
Article ID 390
Start page 1
End page 22
Total pages 22
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-01-02
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
intervention
physical activity
mental health
adolescent
school
health promotion
MENTAL-HEALTH
RISK BEHAVIORS
SELF-EFFICACY
DEPRESSION
SYMPTOMS
GIRLS
INEQUALITIES
FEMININITY
WORLDWIDE
CHILDREN
Summary We assessed which intervention components were associated with change in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and wellbeing through proposed psychosocial mediators. Eight schools (n = 1319; 13–14 years) ran GoActive, where older mentors and in-class-peer-leaders encouraged classes to conduct two new activities/week; students gained points and rewards for activity. We assessed exposures: participant-perceived engagement with components (post-intervention): older mentorship, peer leadership, class sessions, competition, rewards, points entered online; potential mediators (change from baseline): social support, self-efficacy, group cohesion, friendship quality, self-esteem; and outcomes (change from baseline): accelerometer-assessed MVPA (min/day), wellbeing (Warwick-Edinburgh). Mediation was assessed using linear regression models stratified by gender (adjusted for age, ethnicity, language, school, BMI z-score, baseline values), assessing associations between (1) exposures and mediators, (2) exposures and outcomes (without mediators) and (3) exposure and mediator with outcome using bootstrap resampling. No evidence was found to support the use of these components to increase physical activity. Among boys, higher perceived teacher and mentor support were associated with improved wellbeing via various mediators. Among girls, higher perceived mentor support and perception of competition and rewards were positively associated with wellbeing via self-efficacy, self-esteem and social support. If implemented well, mentorship could increase wellbeing among adolescents. Teacher support and class-based activity sessions may be important for boys’ wellbeing, whereas rewards and competition warrant consideration among girls.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17020390
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111707 Family Care
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30134273

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.