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Annealing of ion tracks in apatite under pressure characterized in situ by small angle x-ray scattering

Schauries, Daniel, Afra, Boshra, Mota-Santiago, Pablo, Trautmann, Christina, Lang, Maik, Ewing, Rodney C., Kirby, Nigel and Kluth, Patrick 2020, Annealing of ion tracks in apatite under pressure characterized in situ by small angle x-ray scattering, Scientific Reports, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-57600-y.

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Title Annealing of ion tracks in apatite under pressure characterized in situ by small angle x-ray scattering
Author(s) Schauries, Daniel
Afra, Boshra
Mota-Santiago, PabloORCID iD for Mota-Santiago, Pablo orcid.org/0000-0002-1537-4318
Trautmann, Christina
Lang, Maik
Ewing, Rodney C.
Kirby, Nigel
Kluth, Patrick
Journal name Scientific Reports
Volume number 10
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-01-28
ISSN 2045-2322
Summary Fission track thermochronology is routinely used to investigate the thermal history of sedimentary basins, as well as tectonic uplift and denudation rates. While the effect of temperature on fission track annealing has been studied extensively to calibrate the application of the technique, the effect of pressure during annealing is generally considered to be negligible. However, a previous study suggested elevated pressure results in a significantly different annealing behaviour that was previously unknown. Here, we present a method to study track annealing in situ under high pressure by using synchrotron-based small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). To simulate fission tracks in a controlled environment, ion tracks were created in apatite from Durango, Mexico using 2 GeV Au or Bi ions provided by an ion accelerator facility. Samples were annealed at 250 °C at approximately 1 GPa pressure using diamond anvil cells (DACs) with heating capabilities. Additional in situ annealing experiments at ambient pressure and temperatures between 320 and 390 °C were performed for comparison. At elevated pressure a significantly accelerated annealing rate of the tracks was observed compared with annealing at ambient pressure. However, when extrapolated to geologically relevant temperatures and pressures, the effects become very small. The measurement methodology presented provides a new avenue to study materials behaviour in extreme environments.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-57600-y
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30134849

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.