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The effect of a food addiction explanation model for weight control and obesity on weight stigma.

O'Brien, Kerry S., Puhl, Rebecca M., Latner, Janet D., Lynott, Dermot, Reid, Jessica D., Vakhitova, Zarina, Hunter, John A., Scarf, Damian, Jeanes, Ruth, Bouguettaya, Ayoub and Carter, Adrian 2020, The effect of a food addiction explanation model for weight control and obesity on weight stigma., Nutrients, vol. 12, no. 2, doi: 10.3390/nu12020294.

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Title The effect of a food addiction explanation model for weight control and obesity on weight stigma.
Author(s) O'Brien, Kerry S.
Puhl, Rebecca M.
Latner, Janet D.
Lynott, Dermot
Reid, Jessica D.
Vakhitova, Zarina
Hunter, John A.
Scarf, Damian
Jeanes, Ruth
Bouguettaya, AyoubORCID iD for Bouguettaya, Ayoub orcid.org/0000-0002-5843-3533
Carter, Adrian
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 12
Issue number 2
Article ID 294
Total pages 10
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Switzerland
Publication date 2020-01-22
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) Food addiction
Obesity
Obesity prejudice reduction
Stigma
Weight bias
Weight stigma
Summary There is increasing scientific and public support for the notion that some foods may be addictive, and that poor weight control and obesity may, for some people, stem from having a food addiction. However, it remains unclear how a food addiction model (FAM) explanation for obesity and weight control will affect weight stigma. In two experiments (N = 530 and N = 690), we tested the effect of a food addiction explanation for obesity and weight control on weight stigma. In Experiment 1, participants who received a FAM explanation for weight control and obesity reported lower weight stigma scores (e.g., less dislike of ‘fat people’, and lower personal willpower blame) than those receiving an explanation emphasizing diet and exercise (F(4,525) = 7.675, p = 0.006; and F(4,525) = 5.393, p = 0.021, respectively). In Experiment 2, there was a significant group difference for the dislike of ‘fat people’ stigma measure (F(5,684) = 5.157, p = 0.006), but not for personal willpower weight stigma (F(5,684) = 0.217, p = 0.81). Participants receiving the diet and exercise explanation had greater dislike of ‘fat people’ than those in the FAM explanation and control group (p values < 0.05), with no difference between the FAM and control groups (p > 0.05). The FAM explanation for weight control and obesity did not increase weight stigma and resulted in lower stigma than the diet and exercise explanation that attributes obesity to personal control. The results highlight the importance of health messaging about the causes of obesity and the need for communications that do not exacerbate weight stigma.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu12020294
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
Copyright notice ©2020, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30134863

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.