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Interspecific differences in canopy-derived water, carbon, and nitrogen in upland oak-hickory forest

Limpert, Katy and Siegert, Courtney 2019, Interspecific differences in canopy-derived water, carbon, and nitrogen in upland oak-hickory forest, Forests, vol. 10, no. 12, pp. 1-20, doi: 10.3390/f10121121.

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Title Interspecific differences in canopy-derived water, carbon, and nitrogen in upland oak-hickory forest
Author(s) Limpert, Katy
Siegert, Courtney
Journal name Forests
Volume number 10
Issue number 12
Article ID 1121
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2019
ISSN 1999-4907
1999-4907
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Forestry
forest hydrology
throughfall
stemflow
Quercus
FAGUS-SYLVATICA L.
RAIN EVENT CHARACTERISTICS
SOIL SOLUTION CHEMISTRY
ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION
STEMFLOW CHEMISTRY
SPATIAL VARIABILITY
DRY DEPOSITION
THROUGHFALL DEPOSITION
TEMPORAL STABILITY
TEMPERATE FORESTS
Summary Oaks (Quercus) are a dominant forest species throughout much of the eastern United States. However, oak regeneration failure due to a myriad of issues (e.g., suppression of natural fire, excess nitrogen deposition, pressure from herbivore activity) is leading to a decline in oak dominance. This change may alter forest hydrology and nutrients through variation in species characteristics. Throughfall (TF) and stemflow (SF) quantity and chemistry were sampled during storm events under oak and non-oak (hickory, Carya) species to quantify differences in canopy-derived water and nutrients from an upland oak-hickory forest in Mississippi. Stemflow partitioning was 86% higher in hickory species compared to oak species (394.50 L m−2; p < 0.001). Across all species, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was 1.5 times greater in throughfall (p = 0.024) and 8.7 times greater in stemflow (p < 0.001) compared to rainfall. White oak DOC concentrations (TF: 22.8 ± 5.5 mg L−1; SF: 75.1 ± 9.5 mg L−1) were greater compared to hickory species (TF: 21.0 ± 18.3 mg L−1; SF: 34.5 ± 21.0 mg L−1) (p = 0.048). Results show that while smoother-barked hickory species generate more stemflow volume, rougher-barked oak species generate stemflow that is more enriched in nutrients, which is a function of the canopy characteristics of each species. Within a single stand, this study demonstrates how variable water and nutrient fluxes may be and provide insights into species-level variability in oak-hickory forest types that may be undergoing compositional changes.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/f10121121
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30134867

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.