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Timing is crucial for consequences of migratory connectivity

Bauer, Silke, Lisovski, Simeon and Hahn, Steffen 2016, Timing is crucial for consequences of migratory connectivity, Oikos, vol. 125, no. 5, pp. 605-612, doi: 10.1111/oik.02706.

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Title Timing is crucial for consequences of migratory connectivity
Author(s) Bauer, Silke
Lisovski, Simeon
Hahn, Steffen
Journal name Oikos
Volume number 125
Issue number 5
Start page 605
End page 612
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2016-05
ISSN 0030-1299
1600-0706
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ecology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
INFLUENZA-VIRUS INFECTION
ANIMAL MIGRATION
AVIAN INFLUENZA
POPULATION-DYNAMICS
ATLANTIC SALMON
WILLOW WARBLERS
CLIMATE-CHANGE
ANNUAL CYCLE
PHENOLOGY
STRATEGIES
Summary Migratory connectivity can have important consequences for individuals, populations and communities. We argue that most consequences not only depend on which sites are used but importantly also on when these are used and suggest that the timing of migration is characterised by synchrony, phenology, and consistency. We illustrate the importance of these aspects of timing for shaping the consequences of migratory connectivity on individual fitness, population dynamics, gene flow and community dynamics using examples from throughout the animal kingdom. Exemplarily for one specific process that is shaped by migratory connectivity and the timing of migration - the transmission of parasites and the dynamics of diseases - we underpin our arguments with a dynamic epidemiological network model of a migratory population. Here, we quantitatively demonstrate that variations in migration phenology and synchrony yield disease dynamics that significantly differ from a time-neglecting case. Extending the original definition of migratory connectivity into a spatio-temporal concept can importantly contribute to understanding the links migratory animals make across the globe and the consequences these may have both for the dynamics of their populations and the communities they visit throughout their journeys. Synthesis Migratory connectivity quantifies the links migrant animals make across the globe and these can have manifold consequences - from individual fitness, population dynamics, gene flow to transmission of pathogens and parasites. We show through the use of empirical examples and a conceptual model that these consequences not only depend on which sites are used but importantly also on when these are used. Therefore, we specify three dimensions of migration timing - phenology, synchrony and consistency, which describe the timing of migration 1) relative to development of key resources; 2) relative to the migration of other individuals; and 3) relative to previous migration events. Each of these dimensions can alter the consequences, but typically through different mechanisms.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/oik.02706
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0602 Ecology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30134959

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.