Openly accessible

Examining bone, muscle and fat in middle-aged long-term endurance runners: a cross-sectional study

Mitchell, Ulrike H, Bailey, Bruce and Owen, Patrick J 2020, Examining bone, muscle and fat in middle-aged long-term endurance runners: a cross-sectional study, Journal of clinical medicine, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.3390/jcm9020522.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Examining bone, muscle and fat in middle-aged long-term endurance runners: a cross-sectional study
Author(s) Mitchell, Ulrike H
Bailey, Bruce
Owen, Patrick JORCID iD for Owen, Patrick J orcid.org/0000-0003-3924-9375
Journal name Journal of clinical medicine
Volume number 9
Issue number 2
Article ID 522
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-02
ISSN 2077-0383
2077-0383
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
exercise
body composition
adipose tissue
healthy aging
running
Summary Aerobic exercise training has many known cardiovascular benefits that may promote healthy aging. It is not known if long-term aerobic exercise training is also associated with structural benefits (e.g., lower fat mass, higher areal bone mineral density (BMD) and greater muscle mass). We evaluated these parameters in middle-aged long-term endurance runners compared to sex-, age-, height-, and weight-matched non-running controls. Total and regional lean and fat mass and areal BMD were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Sagittal magnetic resonance images captured the cross-sectional area and thickness of the lumbar multifidus. Runners (n = 10; all male) had a mean (standard deviation; SD) age of 49 (4) years, height of 178.9 (4.9) cm, weight of 67.8 (5.8) kg, body mass index (BMI) of 21.4 (1.4) kg/m2 and had been running 82.6 (27.9) km/week for 23 (13) years. Controls (n = 9) had a mean (SD) age of 51 (5) years, height of 176.0 (5.1) cm, weight of 72.8 (7.1) kg, and BMI of 23.7 (2.1) kg/m2. BMI was greater in controls (p = 0.010). When compared to controls on average, runners had a 10 percentage-point greater total body lean mass than controls (p = 0.001) and 14% greater trunk lean mass (p = 0.010), as well as less total body (8.6 kg; p < 0.001), arm (58%; p = 0.002), leg (52%; p < 0.001), trunk (73%; p < 0.001), android (91%; p < 0.001), and gynoid fat mass (64%; p < 0.001). No differences were observed between groups for BMD outcomes or multifidus size. These results underscore the benefits of endurance running to body composition that carry over to middle-age.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/jcm9020522
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30135317

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 17 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Sun, 01 Mar 2020, 20:20:58 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.