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Bringing the city to the country: relationships between streetscape vegetation type and bird assemblages in a major regional centre

Champness, Brendan S., Palmer, Grant C. and Fitzsimons, James A. 2019, Bringing the city to the country: relationships between streetscape vegetation type and bird assemblages in a major regional centre, Journal of urban ecology, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1093/jue/juz018.

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Title Bringing the city to the country: relationships between streetscape vegetation type and bird assemblages in a major regional centre
Author(s) Champness, Brendan S.
Palmer, Grant C.
Fitzsimons, James A.ORCID iD for Fitzsimons, James A. orcid.org/0000-0003-4277-8040
Journal name Journal of urban ecology
Volume number 5
Issue number 1
Article ID juz018
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2019
ISSN 2058-5543
Keyword(s) urbanisation
bird habitat
conservation planning
remnant vegetation
exotic streetscapes
native streetscapes
Summary Urbanisation is a leading cause of biodiversity loss and habitat fragmentation internationally, and the conservation of representative native assemblages is a challenge confronting environmental managers in expanding urban landscapes. This study investigates the bird assemblages occurring in a rapidly growing regional centre, Ballarat, southeastern Australia. It aims to examine the relationships between urbanisation and bird communities in a regional city by investigating the differences in bird assemblage composition related to the type of vegetation (native or exotic) in urban streetscapes. Bird surveys were completed across four broad habitat types: remnant vegetation, exotic streetscapes, native streetscapes and newly developed streetscapes. Each habitat type had three 1 ha replicate sites. Results show that remnant vegetation fringing residential areas and native streetscapes supported around 60% more native bird species than exotic and newly developed streetscapes. Avian species composition was significantly different between broad habitat types, with remnant vegetation and native streetscapes maintaining representative native bird assemblages, but exotic streetscapes and newly developed streetscapes were dominated by introduced birds. Our results show that, for representative native bird assemblages to be maintained in urban areas, the maintenance of remnant and native vegetation is essential.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/jue/juz018
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30135336

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.