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The modelled population obesity-related health benefits of reducing consumption of discretionary foods in Australia

Lal, Anita, Peeters, Anna, Brown, Vicki, Nguyen, Phuong, Tran, Huong Ngoc Quynh, Nguyen, Tan, Tonmukayakul, Utsana, Sacks, Gary, Calache, Hanny, Martin, Jane, Moodie, Marj and Ananthapavan, Jaithri 2020, The modelled population obesity-related health benefits of reducing consumption of discretionary foods in Australia, Nutrients, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.3390/nu12030649.

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Title The modelled population obesity-related health benefits of reducing consumption of discretionary foods in Australia
Author(s) Lal, AnitaORCID iD for Lal, Anita orcid.org/0000-0001-6921-6617
Peeters, AnnaORCID iD for Peeters, Anna orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-9132
Brown, VickiORCID iD for Brown, Vicki orcid.org/0000-0003-2891-9476
Nguyen, Phuong
Tran, Huong Ngoc QuynhORCID iD for Tran, Huong Ngoc Quynh orcid.org/0000-0003-4892-8345
Nguyen, Tan
Tonmukayakul, UtsanaORCID iD for Tonmukayakul, Utsana orcid.org/0000-0002-6464-744X
Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Calache, HannyORCID iD for Calache, Hanny orcid.org/0000-0002-1613-0585
Martin, Jane
Moodie, MarjORCID iD for Moodie, Marj orcid.org/0000-0001-6890-5250
Ananthapavan, JaithriORCID iD for Ananthapavan, Jaithri orcid.org/0000-0002-5957-6931
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 12
Issue number 3
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
obesity
discretionary foods
sugar-sweetened beverages
healthcare costs
COST-EFFECTIVENESS
ITEM SIZES
TAX
MEXICO
SNACK
BMI
Summary Over one third of Australians’ daily energy intake is from discretionary foods and drinks. While many health promotion efforts seek to limit discretionary food intake, the population health impact of reductions in the consumption of different types of discretionary foods (e.g., sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), confectionery, sweet biscuits) has not been quantified. This study estimated the potential reductions in body weight, obesity-related disease incidence, and healthcare cost savings associated with consumption of one less serving per week of different discretionary foods. Reductions in the different types of discretionary food were modelled individually to estimate the impact on energy consumption and population body weight by 5-year age and sex groups. It was assumed that one serving of discretionary food each week was replaced with either a serving of fruit or popcorn, and a serving (375 mL) of SSBs was replaced with coffee, tea, or milk. Proportional multi-state multiple-cohort Markov modelling estimated likely resultant health adjusted life years (HALYs) gained and healthcare costs saved over the lifetime of the 2010 Australian population. A reduction of one serving of SSBs (375 mL) had the greatest potential impact in terms of weight reduction, particularly in ages 19–24 years (mean 0.31 kg, 95% UI: 0.23 kg to 0.37 kg) and overall healthcare cost savings of AUD 793.4 million (95% UI: 589.1 M to 976.1 M). A decrease of one serving of sweet biscuits had the second largest potential impact on weight change overall, with healthcare cost savings of $640.7 M (95% CI: $402.6 M to $885.8 M) and the largest potential weight reduction amongst those aged 75 years and over (mean 0.21 kg, 95% UI: 0.14 kg to 0.27 kg). The results demonstrate that small reductions in discretionary food consumption are likely to have substantial health benefits at the population level. Moreover, the study highlights that policy responses to improve population diets may need to be tailored to target different types of foods for different population groups.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu12030649
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30135441

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.