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Using the technology acceptance model to explore adolescents’ perspectives on combining technologies for physical activity promotion within an intervention: usability study

Drehlich, Mark, Naraine, Michael, Rowe, Katie, Lai, Samuel K., Salmon, Jo, Brown, Helen, Koorts, Harriet, Macfarlane, Susie and Ridgers, Nicola D. 2020, Using the technology acceptance model to explore adolescents’ perspectives on combining technologies for physical activity promotion within an intervention: usability study, Journal of medical internet research, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.2196/15552.

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Title Using the technology acceptance model to explore adolescents’ perspectives on combining technologies for physical activity promotion within an intervention: usability study
Author(s) Drehlich, Mark
Naraine, MichaelORCID iD for Naraine, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-9132-1269
Rowe, KatieORCID iD for Rowe, Katie orcid.org/0000-0001-7121-5605
Lai, Samuel K.
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Brown, HelenORCID iD for Brown, Helen orcid.org/0000-0002-5460-3654
Koorts, HarrietORCID iD for Koorts, Harriet orcid.org/0000-0003-1303-6064
Macfarlane, SusieORCID iD for Macfarlane, Susie orcid.org/0000-0002-8904-8945
Ridgers, Nicola D.ORCID iD for Ridgers, Nicola D. orcid.org/0000-0001-5713-3515
Journal name Journal of medical internet research
Volume number 22
Issue number 3
Article ID e15552
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher JMIR
Place of publication Toronto, Canada
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1438-8871
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Medical Informatics
fitness trackers
social media
physical activity
youth
REPORT CARD
FITNESS
FACEBOOK
CHILDREN
Summary Background: Wearable activity trackers and social media have been identified as having the potential to increase physical activity among adolescents, yet little is known about the perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of the technology by adolescents.Objective: The aim of this study was to use the technology acceptance model to explore adolescents’ acceptance of wearable activity trackers used in combination with social media within a physical activity intervention.Methods: The Raising Awareness of Physical Activity study was a 12-week physical activity intervention that combined a wearable activity tracker (Fitbit Flex) with supporting digital materials that were delivered using social media (Facebook). A total of 124 adolescents aged 13 to 14 years randomized to the intervention group (9 schools) participated in focus groups immediately post intervention. Focus groups explored adolescents’ perspectives of the intervention and were analyzed using pen profiles using a coding framework based on the technology acceptance model.Results: Adolescents reported that Fitbit Flex was useful as it motivated them to be active and provided feedback about their physical activity levels. However, adolescents typically reported that Fitbit Flex required effort to use, which negatively impacted on their perceived ease of use. Similarly, Facebook was considered to be a useful platform for delivering intervention content. However, adolescents generally noted preferences for using alternative social media websites, which may have impacted on negative perceptions concerning Facebook’s ease of use. Perceptions of technological risks included damage to or loss of the device, integrity of data, and challenges with both Fitbit and Facebook being compatible with daily life.Conclusions: Wearable activity trackers and social media have the potential to impact adolescents’ physical activity levels. The findings from this study suggest that although the adolescents recognized the potential usefulness of the wearable activity trackers and the social media platform, the effort required to use these technologies, as well as the issues concerning risks and compatibility, may have influenced overall engagement and technology acceptance. As wearable activity trackers and social media platforms can change rapidly, future research is needed to examine the factors that may influence the acceptance of specific forms of technology by using the technology acceptance model.
Language eng
DOI 10.2196/15552
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 08 Information and Computing Sciences
11 Medical and Health Sciences
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30135525

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Created: Mon, 09 Mar 2020, 15:13:17 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.