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Research engagement changes attitudes and behaviours towards agrichemical safety in Australian farmers

Russell-Green, Sienna, Cotton, Jacqueline and Brumby, Susan 2020, Research engagement changes attitudes and behaviours towards agrichemical safety in Australian farmers, Safety, vol. 6, no. 1, doi: 10.3390/safety6010016.

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Title Research engagement changes attitudes and behaviours towards agrichemical safety in Australian farmers
Author(s) Russell-Green, Sienna
Cotton, JacquelineORCID iD for Cotton, Jacqueline orcid.org/0000-0002-7893-5901
Brumby, SusanORCID iD for Brumby, Susan orcid.org/0000-0001-6332-3374
Journal name Safety
Volume number 6
Issue number 1
Article ID 16
Total pages 17
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-03
ISSN 2313-576X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
cholinesterase
farmers
organophosphates
attitude
agriculture
health literacy
safety
research translation
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
WORKERS
KNOWLEDGE
Summary There is limited research that evaluates the effect of farmer involvement in agrichemical exposure surveillance on their attitudes and behaviour towards pesticide handling and use of personal protective equipment. This limited follow-up study aimed to (i) evaluate attitudes/behaviours towards the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) among farmers who participated in the In-Field Personalised Cholinesterase Assessment Project (PCAP) (2016/17); and (ii) qualitatively assess the effect of monthly presentation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) testing results on farmer agrichemical safety practices and behaviours prior to, and following participation in PCAP. This study surveyed 42 farming men and women, asking questions about agrichemical usage and hygiene practices. The majority of surveyed farmers’ self-apply agrichemicals on their farm (97.6%), with 81% reporting that involvement in PCAP research changed the way they handled Organophosphates (OPs)—a widely used insecticide in agriculture. By enabling people to think critically about their exposure, there was a 66% increase in frequency of respirator usage post-PCAP. Following this, participants were invited to take part in one-on-one interviews to further discuss their involvement in PCAP. Many responses were positive, with participants stating they were more aware and cautious of their own practices. This study determined that research participation and point-of-care testing and education can result in effective engagement of farmers and farm workers, increase health literacy and change farming practice—highlighting the importance of an interactive, participatory model in order to bring about change, to reduce possible pesticide exposures.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/safety6010016
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30135619

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.