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The Performance Gap in Energy-Efficient Office Buildings: How the Occupants Can Help?

Ali, Qadeer, Thaheem, Muhammad Jamaluddin, Ullah, Fahim and Sepasgozar, Samad M. E. 2020, The Performance Gap in Energy-Efficient Office Buildings: How the Occupants Can Help?, Energies, vol. 13, no. 6, pp. 1-27, doi: 10.3390/en13061480.

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Title The Performance Gap in Energy-Efficient Office Buildings: How the Occupants Can Help?
Author(s) Ali, Qadeer
Thaheem, Muhammad JamaluddinORCID iD for Thaheem, Muhammad Jamaluddin orcid.org/0000-0001-6092-7842
Ullah, Fahim
Sepasgozar, Samad M. E.
Journal name Energies
Volume number 13
Issue number 6
Article ID 1480
Start page 1
End page 27
Total pages 27
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-03-20
ISSN 1996-1073
1996-1073
Keyword(s) energy performance gap
occupant behavior
agent-based modeling
energy efficiency
energy savings
Summary Rising demand and limited production of electricity are instrumental in spreading the awareness of cautious energy use, leading to the global demand for energy-efficient buildings. This compels the construction industry to smartly design and effectively construct these buildings to ensure energy performance as per design expectations. However, the research tells a different tale: energy-efficient buildings have performance issues. Among several reasons behind the energy performance gap, occupant behavior is critical. The occupant behavior is dynamic and changes over time under formal and informal influences, but the traditional energy simulation programs assume it as static throughout the occupancy. Effective behavioral interventions can lead to optimized energy use. To find out the energy-saving potential based on simulated modified behavior, this study gathers primary building and occupant data from three energy-efficient office buildings in major cities of Pakistan and categorizes the occupants into high, medium, and low energy consumers. Additionally, agent-based modeling simulates the change in occupant behavior under the direct and indirect interventions over a three-year period. Finally, energy savings are quantified to highlight a 25.4% potential over the simulation period. This is a unique attempt at quantifying the potential impact on energy usage due to behavior modification which will help facility managers to plan and execute necessary interventions and software experts to develop effective tools to model the dynamic usage behavior. This will also help policymakers in devising subtle but effective behavior training strategies to reduce energy usage. Such behavioral retrofitting comes at a much lower cost than the physical or technological retrofit options to achieve the same purpose and this study establishes the foundation for it.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/en13061480
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 09 Engineering
02 Physical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30135717

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.