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Lifestyle patterns begin in early childhood, persist and are socioeconomically patterned, confirming the importance of early life interventions

Lioret, Sandrine, Campbell, Karen J., McNaughton, Sarah A., Cameron, Adrian J., Salmon, Jo, Abbott, Gavin and Hesketh, Kylie D. 2020, Lifestyle patterns begin in early childhood, persist and are socioeconomically patterned, confirming the importance of early life interventions, Nutrients, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.3390/nu12030724.

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Title Lifestyle patterns begin in early childhood, persist and are socioeconomically patterned, confirming the importance of early life interventions
Author(s) Lioret, Sandrine
Campbell, Karen J.ORCID iD for Campbell, Karen J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
McNaughton, Sarah A.ORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Cameron, Adrian J.ORCID iD for Cameron, Adrian J. orcid.org/0000-0002-0568-5497
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Abbott, GavinORCID iD for Abbott, Gavin orcid.org/0000-0003-4014-0705
Hesketh, Kylie D.ORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie D. orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 12
Issue number 3
Article ID 724
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-03
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) diet
early childhood
energy balance-related behaviours
lifestyle patterns
physical activity
sedentary behaviour
tracking
Summary Traditional approaches to understanding the behavioural determinants of adiposity have considered diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviour in isolation. Although integrative approaches have identified a variety of lifestyle patterns in children at preschool-age or older, along with some variability by socio-economic positions, this has rarely been examined in younger cohorts. We aimed to identify lifestyle patterns at 1.5, 3.5 and 5 years, including dietary intake, outdoor time and television viewing time, to assess associations with maternal education (as a proxy for socio-economic position), and to investigate their persistence between toddlerhood and preschool age. Participants were 417 and 293 children aged 1.5 y from the Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) and InFANT Extend Programs, respectively. Data were collected using questionnaires at child ages 1.5, 3.5 and 5 y (InFANT); and 1.5 and 3.5 y (InFANT Extend). Principal component analysis was undertaken at each time point on the separate and pooled datasets. Associations between the lifestyle patterns scores and maternal education were assessed with multivariable regression analysis. Two lifestyle patterns (“Discretionary consumption and TV” and “Fruit, vegetables and outdoor”) were identified as early as 1.5 y. They remained consistent across ages and were evident in both datasets. These patterns were inversely and positively associated with maternal education, respectively. Such early clustering of obesity related energy balance behaviours and tracking during early childhood suggests there may be shared antecedents common to the individual behaviours that could be targeted for intervention. Our findings provide support for interventions targeting multiple behaviours and tailored to the level of family socio-economic disadvantage.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu12030724
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID NHMRC 1008879
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30135759

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.