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Development and evaluation of a food frequency questionnaire for use among young children

Zheng, Miaobing, Campbell, Karen J., Scanlan, Emily and McNaughton, Sarah A. 2020, Development and evaluation of a food frequency questionnaire for use among young children, PLoS ONE, vol. 15, no. 3, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0230669.

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Title Development and evaluation of a food frequency questionnaire for use among young children
Author(s) Zheng, MiaobingORCID iD for Zheng, Miaobing orcid.org/0000-0002-4151-3502
Campbell, Karen J.ORCID iD for Campbell, Karen J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Scanlan, Emily
McNaughton, Sarah A.ORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 15
Issue number 3
Article ID e0230669
Total pages 16
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2020-03
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Dietary assessment methods
Multiple-pass method
Relative validity
Semiquantitative FFQ
Total-energy
Self-report
Obesity
Childhood
Reproducibility
Validation
Summary Background/Objectives: 
This study described the development of a parent food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for measuring diets of young children over the past month and the validation of this FFQ against three non-consecutive 24 hour recalls.
  
Subjects/Methods: 
Food and nutrient intakes from a 68-item FFQ were compared with three non-consecutive 24 hour recalls in a follow-up cohort of children aged 1.5, 3.5 and 5.0 years old. Data from both methods were available for 231, 172 and 187 participants at ages 1.5, 3.5 and 5.0 years, respectively.
  
Results: 
Out of 11 nutrients, four (protein, fat, fibre, iron), two (Vitamin C, folate) and three (protein, vitamin C and folate) nutrients showed good-acceptable outcome for 2 out of 3 group-level validation tests at ages 1.5, 3.5 and 5.0 years, respectively. Of 26 food groups, good-acceptable outcome for 2 out of 3 group-level validation tests was revealed for two, four and six food groups at ages 1.5, 3.5 and 5.0 years, respectively. For individual-level validation tests, all nutrients showed good-acceptable outcome for 2 out of 3 individual level tests across three time points, except for folate at age 1.5 years and energy intake at age 3.5 years. Most food groups (22 out of 26) at age 1.5 years and all food groups at both ages 3.5 and 5.0 years showed good-acceptable outcome for 2 out of 3 individual-level validation tests.
  
Conclusions: 
At all three time points, the FFQ demonstrated good-acceptable validity for some nutrients and food groups at group-level, and good-acceptable validity for most nutrients and food groups at individual-level. This quantitative FFQ is a valid and robust tool for assessing total diet of young children and ranking individuals according to nutrient and food intakes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0230669
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, Zheng et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30135895

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.