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Multifaith third spaces: digital activism, Netpeace, and the Australian religious response to climate change

Smith, Geraldine and Halafoff, Anna 2020, Multifaith third spaces: digital activism, Netpeace, and the Australian religious response to climate change, Religions, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.3390/rel11030105.

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Title Multifaith third spaces: digital activism, Netpeace, and the Australian religious response to climate change
Author(s) Smith, Geraldine
Halafoff, AnnaORCID iD for Halafoff, Anna orcid.org/0000-0003-4274-5951
Journal name Religions
Volume number 11
Issue number 3
Article ID 105
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-03
ISSN 2077-1444
Keyword(s) Arts & Humanities
Religion
multifaith spaces
interreligious studies
sacred places
embodiment
materiality
third space
activism
digital activism
climate change
Summary Multifaith spaces typically imply sites where people of diverse faith traditions gather to participate in shared activities or practices, such as multifaith prayer rooms, multifaith art exhibitions, or multifaith festivals. Yet, there is a lack of literature that discusses online multifaith spaces. This paper focuses on the website of an Australian multifaith organisation, the Australian Religious Response to Climate Change (ARRCC), which we argue is a third space of digital activism. We begin by outlining the main aims of the multifaith movement and how it responds to global risks. We then review religion and geography literature on space, politics and poetics, and on material religion and embodiment. Next, we discuss third spaces and digital activism, and then present a thematic and aesthetic analysis on the ARRCC website drawing on these theories. We conclude with a summary of our main findings, arguing that mastery of the online realm through digital third spaces and activism, combined with a willingness to partake in “real-world”, embodied activism, can assist multifaith networks and social networks more generally to develop Netpeace and counter the risks of climate change collaboratively.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/rel11030105
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 220405 Religion and Society
2204 Religion and Religious Studies
Socio Economic Objective 950404 Religion and Society
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID DP180101664
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136000

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.