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Associations between compensable injury, perceived fault and pain and disability 1 year after injury: A registry-based Australian cohort study

Giummarra, MJ, Baker, KS, Ioannou, L, Gwini, Stella May, Gibson, SJ, Arnold, CA, Ponsford, J and Cameron, P 2017, Associations between compensable injury, perceived fault and pain and disability 1 year after injury: A registry-based Australian cohort study, BMJ Open, vol. 7, no. 10, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017350.

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Title Associations between compensable injury, perceived fault and pain and disability 1 year after injury: A registry-based Australian cohort study
Author(s) Giummarra, MJ
Baker, KS
Ioannou, L
Gwini, Stella MayORCID iD for Gwini, Stella May orcid.org/0000-0002-0295-4575
Gibson, SJ
Arnold, CA
Ponsford, J
Cameron, P
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 7
Issue number 10
Article ID e017350
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher BMJ
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-10-05
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
CHRONIC MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN
MOTOR-VEHICLE COLLISION
SELF-EFFICACY
PERSISTENT PAIN
SCALE DEVELOPMENT
FEAR-AVOIDANCE
SPINAL-CORD
INJUSTICE
OUTCOMES
RECOVERY
disability
insurance
musculoskeletal pain
trauma
trauma and stressor related disorders
Summary Objectives Compensable injury increases the likelihood of having persistent pain after injury. Three-quarters of patients report chronic pain after traumatic injury, which is disabling for about one-third of patients. It is important to understand why these patients report disabling pain, in order to develop targeted preventative interventions. This study examined the experience of pain and disability, and investigated their sequential interrelationships with, catastrophising, kinesiophobia and self-efficacy 1 year after compensable and non-compensable injury. Design Observational registry-based cohort study. Setting Metropolitan Trauma Service in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Participants Participants were recruited from the Victorian State Trauma Registry and Victorian Orthopaedic Trauma Outcomes Registry. 732 patients were referred to the study, 82 could not be contacted or were ineligible, 217 declined and 433 participated (66.6% response rate). Outcome measures The Brief Pain Inventory, Glasgow Outcome Scale, EuroQol Five Dimensions questionnaire, Pain Catastrophising Scale, Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, Injustice Experience Questionnaire and the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia. Methods Direct and indirect relationships (via psychological appraisals of pain/injury) between baseline characteristics (compensation, fault and injury characteristics) and pain severity, pain interference, health status and disability were examined with ordinal, linear and logistic regression, and mediation analyses. Results Injury severity, compensable injury and external fault attribution were consistently associated with moderate-to-severe pain, higher pain interference, poorer health status and moderate-to-severe disability. The association between compensable injury, or external fault attribution, and disability and health outcomes was mediated via pain self-efficacy and perceived injustice. Conclusions Given that the associations between compensable injury, pain and disability was attributable to lower self-efficacy and higher perceptions of injustice, interventions targeting the psychological impacts of pain and injury may be especially necessary to improve long-term injury outcomes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017350
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136136

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.